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Behaviour and Well-being of Hens (Gallus Domesticus) in Alternative Housing Environments1,2

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2007

J. V. Craig
Affiliation:
Kansas State UniversityManhattan, 66506, U.S.A.
A. W. Adams
Affiliation:
Kansas State UniversityManhattan, 66506, U.S.A.
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Abstract

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Research Article
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1984

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References

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