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Minimizing losses in poultry breeding and production: how breeding companies contribute to poultry welfare

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2007

D.K. Flock*
Affiliation:
Lohmann Tierzucht GmbH, P.O. Box 460, 27454 Cuxhaven, Germany
K.F. Laughlin
Affiliation:
Aviagen Group. Newbridge, Midlothian, EH28 8SZ, Scotland, UK
J. Bentley
Affiliation:
British United Turkeys Ltd., Hockenhull Hall, Tarvin, Chester, CH3 8LE, UK
*
*Corresponding author: dkfloct@t-online.de
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Abstract

The modern poultry industry has a remarkable record in reducing mortality, applying a combination of effective disease control, adequate nutrition, good husbandry and genetic selection. Primary breeders, specialized in the adaptation of layers, broilers and turkeys to changing demands of a global food market, have made three major contributions in the past: (1) eradication of vertically transmitted disease agents such as lymphoid leucosis viruses, mycoplasmas and salmonellae; (2) selection between and within lines for general liveability and specific disease resistance; and (3) dissemination of management recommendations which may help customers to minimize losses at the commercial level. Current focus is on components of liveability which are directly or indirectly linked to poultry welfare: selection against feather pecking and cannibalism in egg-type chickens and selection against leg disorders and heart/lung dysfunction in rapidly growing meat poultry.

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Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2005

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