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Palm kernel meal in broiler diets: effect on chicken performance and health

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2007

B. Sundu
Affiliation:
School of Animal Studies, The University of Queensland, Australia Universitas Tadulako, Agriculture Faculty, Animal Husbandry Department, Palu, Sulawesi Tengah, Indonesia
A. Kumar
Affiliation:
School of Animal Studies, The University of Queensland, Australia
J. Dingle*
Affiliation:
School of Animal Studies, The University of Queensland, Australia
*
*Corresponding author: j.dingle@uq.edu.au
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Abstract

An increase in the production of palm kernel meal (PKM) coupled with the concern for continued availability of conventional feedstuffs in some parts of the world has led to research to establish the maximum inclusion level of palm kernel meal in broiler diets. The results suggested that palm kernel meal has no anti-nutritional properties and thus its inclusion is safe up to at least 40% in the diet, provided the diet is balanced in amino acids and metabolisable energy. Although feed digestibility is decreased due to high dietary fibre when PKM is included in the diet, the feed intake is increased. This makes total digestible nutrient intake relatively high. β-mannan is the main component of palm kernel meal non-starch polysaccharide (NSP). Both mannose and manno-oligosaccharides have been reported to act as prebiotics. The inclusion of palm kernel meal in the diet improves the immune system of birds and reduces pathogenic bacteria and increases the population of non-pathogenic bacteria in the intestine. These two benefits should be considered as strong recommendations for using palm kernel meal in broiler diets, particularly in palm kernel meal producing countries, not only forincreasing bird productivity but also to improve chicken health. Selective enzyme addition increases feed efficiency and digestibility as well as decreasing the moisture content of faeces.

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Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006

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