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Sorghum grain in poultry feeding

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2009

M. Gualtieri
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Zootecniche, Università di Firenze, Via delle Cascine, 5, 50144 Firenze, Italy
S. Rapaccini
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Zootecniche, Università di Firenze, Via delle Cascine, 5, 50144 Firenze, Italy
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Abstract

The authors review the main studies of the last 30 years concerning the chemical and nutritional features of sorghum grain. They describe the problems related to the tannins which lower to various extents its metabolizable energy value, palatability and protein utilization for chickens. They also emphasize that the new sorghum cultivars with low tannin content and nutritive value similar to maize really are suitable for use as the only cereal component of commercial poultry diets.

Type
Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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