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Thymus vulgaris: alternative to antibiotics in poultry feed

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2012

R.U. KHAN*
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health, Faculty of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Sciences, KP Agricultural University, Peshawar, Pakistan
S. NAZ
Affiliation:
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, GC University, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Z. NIKOUSEFAT
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Razi University, Iran
V. TUFARELLI
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 700100 Valenzano, Bari, Italy
V. LAUDADIO
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 700100 Valenzano, Bari, Italy
*
Corresponding author: rifatullahkhhan@gmail.com
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Abstract

Due to the potentially undesirable effects of antibiotics as growth promoters in poultry production, researchers are looking for viable alternative to limit or replace their use. One such class of comparable alternative is natural source of herbs and medicinal plants. In the last decade, these alternatives have been increasingly used in broiler, layer and Japanese quail diets. Reports have variously claimed that medicinal plants, used as either the whole plant, their leaves or flowers, can enhance poultry performance. From the available literature, it can be concluded that thyme (Thymus vulgaris) belongs to such class of medicinal plant and may be an effective alternative to antibiotics in poultry production. In this review, its effects on different parameters of production performance in poultry are briefly discussed.

Type
Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © World's Poultry Science Association 2012

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