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About the Series

The Elements of Paleontology series is a publishing collaboration between the Paleontological Society and Cambridge University Press. The series covers the full spectrum of topics in paleontology and paleobiology, and related topics in the Earth and life sciences of interest to students and researchers of paleontology.

About the Editor-in-Chief

Colin D. Sumrall is an Assistant Professor of Paleobiology at the University of Tennessee. His research is centered on understanding the paleobiology of extinct echinoderms (starfish and their allies). 

Contact the Editor-in-Chief

If you would like more information about this series, or are interested in writing an Element for the Series, please email Colin at csumrall@utk.edu or the Cambridge University Press editor Matt Lloyd at mlloyd@cambridge.org


Inaugural Elements in the Series

The following first Elements are contributions to the Paleontological Short Course on Education and Public Outreach in Paleontology (organized by Phoebe Cohen,  Rowan Lockwood and Lisa Boush), convened at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in November 2018 (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Links will be added once the Element has been published. 

Flipping the Paleontology Classroom: Benefits, Challenges, and Strategies
Matthew E. Clapham
Integrating Active Learning into Paleontology Classes
Alison N. Olcott
Integrating Macrostrat and Rockd into Undergraduate Earth Science Teaching
Pheobe A. Cohen, Rowan Lockwood, and Shanan Peters
Dinosaurs: A Catalyst For Critical Thought
Darrin Pagnac


Student-Centered Teaching in Paleontology and Geoscience Classrooms
Robyn Mieko Dahl
Confronting Prior Conceptions in Paleontology Courses
Margaret M. Yacobucci
Beyond Hands On: Incorporating Kinesthetic Learning in an Undergraduate Paleontology Class 
David W. Goldsmith

The Neotoma Paleoecology Database: A Research Outreach Nexus
Simon J. Goring, Russell Graham, Shane Oeffler, Amy Myrbo, James S. Oliver, Carol Ormond, and John W. Williams
Incorporating Research into Undergraduate Paleontology Courses: Or a Tale of 23,276 Mulinia Patricia H. Kelley

Equity, Culture, and Place in Teaching Paleontology: Student-Centered Pedagogy for Broadening Participation
Christy C. Visaggi
Utilizing the Paleobiology Database to Provide Educational Opportunities for Undergraduates
Rowan Lockwood, Pheobe A. Cohen, Mark D. Uhen, and Katherine Ryker


The Paleontological Society is an international nonprofit organization devoted exclusively to the science of paleontology: invertebrate and vertebrate paleontology, micropaleontology, and paleobotany. The Society’s mission is to advance the study of the fossil record through scientific research, education, and advocacy. Its vision is to be a leading global advocate for understanding life’s history and evolution. The Society has several membership categories, including regular, amateur/avocational, student, and retired. Members, representing some 40 countries, include professional paleontologists, academicians, science editors, Earth science teachers, museum specialists, undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and amateur/avocational paleontologists. 

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