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11 - Exploiting Data-Driven Hybrid Approaches to Translation in the EXPERT Project

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2019

Meng Ji
Affiliation:
University of Sydney
Michael Oakes
Affiliation:
University of Wolverhampton
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Summary

Technologies have transformed the way we work, and this is also applicable to the translation industry. In the past thirty to thirty-five years, professional translators have experienced an increased technification of their work. Barely thirty years ago, a professional translator would not have received a translation assignment attached to an e-mail or via an FTP and yet, for the younger generation of professional translators, receiving an assignment by electronic means is the only reality they know. In addition, as pointed out in several works such as Folaron (2010) and Kenny (2011), professional translators now have a myriad of tools available to use in the translation process.

Type
Chapter
Information
Advances in Empirical Translation Studies
Developing Translation Resources and Technologies
, pp. 198 - 216
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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