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2 - Constructive Artificial Neural-Network Models for Cognitive Development

from Part I - Cognitive Development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2017

Nancy Budwig
Affiliation:
Clark University, Massachusetts
Elliot Turiel
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
Philip David Zelazo
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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