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10 - Epidemiology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

from Section 2 - Practical Aspects of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2018

Leonardo F. Fontenelle
Affiliation:
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Murat Yücel
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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