Skip to main content
×
Home
Adam Smith and the Virtues of Enlightenment
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 7
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Sivertsen, Sveinung S. 2017. Love Redirected: On Adam Smith's Love of Praiseworthiness. Journal of Scottish Philosophy, Vol. 15, Issue. 1, p. 101.


    Wolcott, Gregory 2016. The Rehabilitation of Adam Smith for Catholic Social Teaching. Journal of Business Ethics,


    Warner, Cameron David 2014. On the Relationship Between Method and the Object of Study When Studying Religion. Numen, Vol. 61, Issue. 2-3, p. 131.


    Kim, Kwangsu 2014. Adam Smith's and Douglass North's Multidisciplinary Approach to Economic Development. American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Vol. 73, Issue. 1, p. 3.


    Brady, Emily 2011. Adam Smith's ‘Sympathetic Imagination’ and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Environment. Journal of Scottish Philosophy, Vol. 9, Issue. 1, p. 95.


    Aznar, Estrella Trincado 2007. Costes de transacción vs costes de jerarquía en la provisión de bienes: una interpretación de la teoría smithiana. Revista de Historia Económica / Journal of Iberian and Latin American Economic History, Vol. 25, Issue. 02, p. 261.


    Schliesser, Eric 2005. Wonder in the face of scientific revolutions: Adam Smith on Newton's ‘Proof’ of Copernicanism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Vol. 13, Issue. 4, p. 697.


    ×
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    Adam Smith and the Virtues of Enlightenment
    • Online ISBN: 9780511608964
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511608964
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to? *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

Charles Griswold has written a comprehensive philosophical study of Smith's moral and political thought. Griswold sets Smith's work in the context of the Enlightenment and relates it to current discussions in moral and political philosophy. Smith's appropriation as well as criticism of ancient philosophy, and his carefully balanced defence of a liberal and humane moral and political outlook, are also explored. This 1999 book is a major philosophical and historical reassessment of a key figure in the Enlightenment that will be of particular interest to philosophers and political and legal theorists, as well as historians of ideas, rhetoric, and political economy.

Reviews

'Griswold’s arguments are deep, far-reaching and all the more effective for the many interesting examples, drawn from recent events and biographical accounts. He sets a paradigm before us, in which one person injures another, seeks forgiveness and then receives it … Griswold tells us much about forgiveness, about the mental processes involved in it, and the way in which interpersonal relations are shaped by it.'

Roger Scruton Source: The Times Literary Supplement

‘In a rich and detailed examination of The Theory of Moral Sentiments Griswold presents Smith as a rhetorically sophisticated dialectical thinker, defending Enlightenment values while aware of their profound costs, seeking a philosophical system while distrustful of the system, and aiming to guard ordinary moral life against excessive reflection. This is a major study, resting on a thorough rethinking of all of smith’s work. Griswold shows Smith to be a more complex moral thinker than he has been taken to be, and one far more pertinent to current issues.’

Jerome B. Schneewind - John Hopkins University

‘With one eye on the eighteenth century and the other on our current predicament, Charles Griswold’s Adam Smith and the Virtues of Enlightenment is wonderfully interesting and informative, philosophically stimulating and acute, and beautifully written.’

Stephen Darwall - University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

‘… exemplary in spelling out many of Smith’s arguments and subjecting them to analytic scrutiny. If reading it required effort, the reward is substantial.’

Source: Wall Street Journal

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send:
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 277 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 548 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 21st November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.