Skip to main content
×
Home
Before Newton
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 4
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Recio, José Luis González 2005. El taller de las ideas. p. 115.

    Goldstein, Joel A. 2000. A Matter of Great Magnitude: The Conflict over Arithmetization in 16th-, 17th-, and 18th-Century English Editions of Euclid's Elements Books I Through VI (1561–1795). Historia Mathematica, Vol. 27, Issue. 1, p. 36.


    Campbell, Gordon Corns, Thomas N. Hale, John K. Holmes, David I. and Tweedie, Fiona J. 1997. The Provenance of De Doctrina Christiana. Milton Quarterly, Vol. 31, Issue. 3, p. 67.


    1991. List of publications on the economic and social histoy of Great Britain and Ireland. The Economic History Review, Vol. 44, Issue. 4, p. 683.


    ×
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    Before Newton
    • Online ISBN: 9780511983559
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511983559
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to? *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

A comprehensive re-evaluation of Isaac Barrow (1630–1677), one of the more prominent and intriguing of all seventeenth-century men of science. Barrow is remembered today - if at all - only as Sir Isaac Newton's mentor and patron, but he in fact made important contributions to the disciplines of optics and geometry. Moreover, he was a prolific and influential preacher as well as a renowned classical scholar. By seeking to understand Barrow's mathematical work, primarily within the confines of the pre-Newtonian scientific framework, the book offers a substantial rethinking of his scientific acumen. In addition to providing a biographical study of Barrow, it explores the intimate connections among his scientific, philological and religious worldviews in an attempt to convey the complexity of the seventeenth-century culture that gave rise to Isaac Barrow, a breed of polymath that would become increasingly rare with the advent of modern science.

Reviews

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send:
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 52 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 130 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 24th November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.