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  • Cited by 5
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    This chapter has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Kruschinski, Simon and Haller, André 2018. Strategische Politische Kommunikation im digitalen Wandel. p. 289.

    Baldassarri, Delia and Abascal, Maria 2017. Field Experiments Across the Social Sciences. Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 43, Issue. 1, p. 41.

    Condon, Meghan Larimer, Christopher W. and Panagopoulos, Costas 2016. Partisan Social Pressure and Voter Mobilization. American Politics Research, Vol. 44, Issue. 6, p. 982.

    Keane, Lauren Deschamps and Nickerson, David W. 2015. When Reports Depress Rather Than Inspire: A Field Experiment Using Age Cohorts as Reference Groups. Journal of Political Marketing, Vol. 14, Issue. 4, p. 381.

    McCabe, Deborah Brown and Michelson, Melissa R. 2015. Pushing Too Hard: Using Door-in-the-Face to Get Voters out the Door. Journal of Political Marketing, Vol. 14, Issue. 4, p. 316.

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  • Print publication year: 2011
  • Online publication date: June 2012

16 - Voter Mobilization

Summary

Civic participation is an essential component of a healthy democracy. Voting allows citizens to communicate preferences to elected officials and influence who holds public office. At the same time, deficiencies and asymmetries of participation in the United States call into question the representativeness of elected officials and public policies. Yet, although political activity is crucial for the equal protection of interests, participation is often seen by individuals as irrational or excessively costly, and it is well known that turnout in the United States lags well behind that of other democracies. Scholars have consistently found that participation is linked to socioeconomic variables, psychological orientations, and recruitment. Candidates, parties, and organizations thus spend considerable effort mobilizing electoral activity. This chapter highlights contributions made by field experiments to the study of voter mobilization, the problems faced by such work, and opportunities for future study.

Observational Studies

Nonexperimental studies have primarily relied on survey research to demonstrate correlations between self-reported mobilization and civic-minded behaviors, while also controlling for demographic characteristics (e.g., age, education, income) that are known to be significant predictors of turnout. The conclusion usually reached is that mobilization efforts are generally effective (e.g., Rosenstone and Hansen 1993; Verba, Schlozman, and Brady 1995). However, four major empirical hurdles render this conclusion suspect.

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Cambridge Handbook of Experimental Political Science
  • Online ISBN: 9780511921452
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511921452
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