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  • 1 - Literature of the early Ming to mid-Ming (1375–1572)
    pp 1-62
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521855594.003
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The literature of the early and middle Ming can be divided roughly into three periods: 1375 to 1450, 1450 to 1520, and1520 to 1572. This chapter begins in the 1370s with the first few years of the Ming, a transitional time regarded by many as one of the darkest periods for Chinese intellectuals. The beginning of the first period was far from being a cultural revival. Zhu Yuanzhang, the Hongwu Emperor, was suspicious to the point of paranoia, and was completely unpredictable in his responses to poetry. The second period saw a growing weakness in the central government - especially following the battle of Tumu at which the Yingzong Emperor was taken prisoner by the Mongols, but political weakness ironically led to a period of real growth in the field of literature. The third period of early and middle Ming literature centers on the age of the Jiajing Emperor.
  • 2 - The literary culture of the late Ming (1573–1644)
    pp 63-151
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521855594.004
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter describes the impact that the growth of publishing and the emergence of a large diverse readership had both on traditional forms like poetry and on the rise of new ones like vernacular short stories and southern plays. The first section discusses developments in forms of literature traditionally associated with the elite, namely poetry, nonfictional prose, and examination essays. The second covers literature produced by and for a distinctive new group, which the historian Yu Ying-shih calls the shishang, or a new elite whose wealth was based on commerce and whose culture was based in the urban centers of Jiangnan. The chapter treats both long and short fiction, in vernacular and classical Chinese. Finally, it discusses drama, the form that dominated the imagination of the late Ming period. The chapter is about the mingling of high and low, the onstage and offstage, the elite and the popular.
  • 3 - Early Qing to 1723
    pp 152-244
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521855594.005
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The literary culture of the early Qing cannot be considered separately from its late Ming counterpart, nor from the history, memory, and representations of the Ming-Qing transition. This chapter begins with an overview of early Qing perspectives on late Ming thought and culture as a way of juxtaposing cultural self-perceptions and self-definitions before and after the fall of the Ming. It demonstrates early Qing writers that purport to bear witness to and recall the trauma of dynastic transition, and to represent how selves and identities are shattered and reconstituted, obsessively stake their truth claim on memory and genuine emotion. The chapter also discusses the continuities, transformations, and reversals in ideological terms and then explores their sociological contexts in a brief survey of the conditions facilitating or inhibiting literary production: the shifting functions of literary communities, the developments in printing and publishing, the varying role of censorship, and the changing sociopolitical landscape from the 1640s to the 1720s.
  • 4 - The literati era and its demise (1723–1840)
    pp 245-342
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521855594.006
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter provides information on the high Qing or middle Qing era. The Yongzheng reign is considered concurrently with the Qianlong era, which has long been seen as both the apex of accumulated prosperity and the beginning of the decline of the Qing dynasty. Its main literary figures, including the Qianlong Emperor, enjoyed extraordinary longevity, and there were no major events to mark turning points in the literary history of this period. The popularity of professional troupes in Nanjing can be seen in The Scholars, which was written during the 1730s and 1740s. Nearly all the major regional theaters underwent transformations in the modern era. In the current age of globalization, multiculturalism, and the market economy, these controversies are likely to continue, perhaps even intensify. Written records about the performance literature of this period are sparse and scattered, but there is enough evidence to sketch in broad outline the activities of storytelling and singing in Yangzhou, Beijing, and other cities.
  • 5 - Prosimetric and verse narrative
    pp 343-412
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521855594.007
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Precise dating, an obsession of elite Chinese culture from the beginning in the Chinese literature, has made the chronological account one of the most popular forms of historical writing. Distrust in the role of the anonymous but literate authors of the texts turned research toward the oral literature of the countryside as well as the living traditions of 'minor arts'. "Minor arts" refers to any kind of performance involving song, comic dialogue, or prosimetric and verse narrative. Just as Buddhist monks and nuns preached their religion using precious scrolls, Daoist priests did so through 'sentiments of the Way'. The term commonly used for non-religious prosimetric narratives between the thirteenth and the sixteenth centuries was ballad-narratives. While drum ballad texts were long, youth books that flourished in Beijing from the mid-eighteenth to the end of the nineteenth century, tended to be short.
  • 6 - Chinese literature from 1841 to 1937
    pp 413-564
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521855594.008
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter deals with the rise and development of Chinese literature from the end of the First Opium War to the eve of the Second Sino- Japanese War. It explores what makes Chinese literature since the midnineteenth century 'modern'. The chapter proposes to view Chinese literary modernization as a long and sprawling process traceable to the last decades of the nineteenth century. It argues that one must acknowledge the advent of the modern at any given historical juncture as a fierce competition of new possibilities, where the result does not necessarily reflect the best or even any one of the possibilities. Reform-cum-antiquarianism provoked drastic reactions at a time when the temporal paradigms of evolution and revolution were introduced to China. Tongcheng stylistics also provides significant clues to the transformation of late Qing cultural practice. The Second Sino-Japanese War brought the development of the various literary movements to a halt.
  • 7 - Chinese literature from 1937 to the present
    pp 565-705
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521855594.009
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The outbreak of the Second Sino-Japanese War changed China forever. As the Guomindang in Chinese (GMD) lost ground in the Civil War, its rule in Taiwan became more heavy-handed. Since the early 1980s, the mainland, Taiwan, and Hong Kong have become inextricably connected. The rapidly urbanizing and globalizing environment and the widespread use of computer and information technology in the three regions also generate new experiences and inspire new experimentation. Publications in the traditional (fanti) script that come out in Taiwan are considered separate editions for copyright purposes. The uncensored Taiwanese (or Hong Kong) edition tends to be the one used for translation into foreign languages. Another more significant aspect of cross-straits publishing is the publishing rights trade. Meanwhile, Chinese-language Web literature was also emerging in Taiwan and the first Chinese-language author to gain celebrity status for an online work was the Taiwanese author Cai Zhiheng.
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