Skip to main content
×
Home
The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature
    • Online ISBN: 9781139055970
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521790079
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to? *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English literature, an age marked by revolution, reaction and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. This History presents an engaging account of six decades of literary production around the turn of the nineteenth century. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, the essays are designed both to provide a narrative of Romantic literature and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. One group of essays addresses the various locations of literary activity – both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. A second set of essays traces how texts responded to great historical and social change. With a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, this volume is an important resource for research and teaching in the field.

Reviews

‘Fifty years ago, literary studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, created by the likes of M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, and Harold Bloom; two decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label ‘Romantic' was ‘historically unsound'. This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, the contributors present kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the ‘new poetry', drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (John Brewer writes exceptionally well on ‘sentiment and sensibility'); currently fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and - most interesting - the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland). The result is an excellent book useful … for its summaries of early twenty-first-century thinking about British literary culture from the 1770s to the 1830s.'

Source: Choice

    • Aa
    • Aa
Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send:
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Page 2 of 2


  • 25 - Representation restructured
    pp 579-600
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521790079.027
  • View abstract
    Summary
    John Stuart Mill, in his essays on Jeremy Bentham and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, observes that 'these two men', though 'they agreed in being closet-students'. Mill's account helps to bring out certain similarities in their projects. Both were crucial participants in a massive change in the understanding of representation that occurred within their lives and those of their Romantic contemporaries. The various different kinds of attention to representation, essayistic evaluation, the contribution of acceptance by an audience, and detailed analysis of the differences between one use of language and another, help to indicate the extent to which the Romantics restructured representation. Didacticism, conceived as the effort to promulgate particular beliefs in literary works, came to seem less like an unpleasant option and more like an unavailable one. While Bentham sought to evaluate individual actions in relation to systematic social action, Shelley repeatedly described poetry as lending 'systematic form' to social imagination.
  • 26 - Romantic cultural imperialism
    pp 601-620
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521790079.028
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Scholars gradually recognize that most of the major writers of the Romantic period had at least a passing flirtation with the most prominent cultural component of imperialism, namely, Orientalism. Nature poetry, suggests that Orientalism helped to define political, social and cultural practices in areas far removed from the East itself. the most successful Orientalist tales or pictures in the Romantic period, of which Byron would later claim to provide the finest 'samples' depended upon a sometimes jarring discrepancy. The concept of the sovereign Western subject would prove essential to the work of the empire-builders of the nineteenth century. Wordsworth's struggle is therefore to rescue Poetry from being merely 'a matter of amusement and idle pleasure', as though a taste for Poetry were as indifferent as a taste for Rope-dancing, or Frontiniac or Sherry'. Orientalism, then, was hardly just a thematic 'sideshow' for Romantic poetry.
  • 27 - Romanticism and religious modernity: from natural supernaturalism to literary sectarianism
    pp 621-647
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521790079.029
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Romanticism becomes a spiritual dispensation, an individual or coterie struggle to come to terms with the eclipse of shared Christian doctrines. Reclaiming visionary Romanticism as a spiritual exercise did not yield agreement on the extent to which an apocalypse transferred to consciousness or to nature actually sustained Christian faith. English literary Romanticism as a discrete aesthetic project worked out across two generations by a visionary company of male poets has given way to an interest in the many other voices that found expression in the Romantic period. As the older Dissenting congregations tended just to hold their numbers or even to decline during the Romantic period, growth and expansive activism was achieved elsewhere, in a more emotional register and often at the lower end of the social scale, with the rise of Evangelical piety. Before there was 'Romanticism' there were a host of contemporary sectarian literary designations, conceived in antagonism and sustained in debate.
  • 28 - Is Romanticism finished?
    pp 648-664
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521790079.030
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Romanticism is a doomed tradition, yet a perpetually self-renewing one. The novel, Disgrace's central character, David Lurie, is an academic, a literary scholar, a Romanticist, in fact. Coetzee develops an interpretation of European Romanticism. His book is thus in great measure a satiric investigation of a wide range of Romantic ideologies, from Wordsworthian sincerity, on one end, to Byronic intellectual flamboyance on the other. If Romanticism is perpetually 'doomed' and perpetually 'self-renewing', those reciprocities draw on a common energy source: imaginative scepticism. Hemans poem locates not a sceptical deficiency but the exact form of Hemans's Romanticism. 'Byron' and 'The Sceptic' are magical mirrors giving Hemans access to that dreadful Christian situation within which Hemans's special Romanticism exfoliates: the Romanticism of maternal fear and anxiety. Romantic works flourish all about us in popular and highbrow art, music, and writing.

Page 2 of 2


This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.


J. Th. Leerssen , ‘Fiction, Poetics and Cultural Stereotype: Local Colour in Scott, Morgan, and Maturin’, Modern Language Review, 86:2 (April 1991).

Ina Ferris , The Romantic National Tale and the Question of Ireland, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Nick Groom , The Making of Percy’s Reliques, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999.

W. J. B. Owen and Jane Worthington Smyser ed., ‘Preface to the Edition of 1815’, in The Prose Works of William Wordsworth, 3 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1974), vol. III

Rosemary Sweet , ‘Antiquaries and Antiquities in Eighteenth-Century England’, Eighteenth-Century Studies 34:2 (2001).

Sandra Macpherson , ‘Lovelace, Ltd.’, English Literary History 65 (1998).

John Hunter , Essays and Observations on Natural History, Anatomy, Physiology, Psychology, and Geology, 2 vols. (London: John Van Voorst, 1861), vol. I

W. Jackson Bate , The Burden of the Past and the English Poet (New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1970)

Robert Wood , The Ruins of Palmyra, otherwise Tedmor, in the Desart (London, 1753).

Sheridan Gilley , ‘Christianity and Enlightenment: A Historical Survey’, History of European Ideas 1 (1981)

Josephine McDonagh , De Quincey’s Disciplines, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994.

Catherine Packham , ‘The Physiology of Political Economy: Vitalism and Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations’, Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (2002).

Clifford Siskin ,‘Novels and Systems’, Novel 34:2 (Spring 2001).

Emily Lorraine de Montluzin , The Anti-Jacobins, 1798–1800: The Early Contributors to the Anti-Jacobin Review, New York: St Martin’s, 1988.

Robert Burns , The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns, ed. James Kinsley , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1968.

Gerard Carruthers , and Alan Rawes (eds.), English Romanticism and the Celtic World, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Biancamaria Fontana , Rethinking the Politics of Commercial Society: The Edinburgh Review 1802–1832, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985.

John O. Hayden (ed.), Scott: The Critical Heritage, New York: Barnes & Noble, 1970.

Colin Kidd , Subverting Scotland’s Past: Scottish Whig Historians and the Creation of an Anglo-British Identity, 1689–c. 1830, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Yoon Sun Lee , Nationalism and Irony: Burke, Scott, Carlyle, New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Andrew Lincoln , Walter Scott and Modernity, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007.

Susan Manning , The Puritan-Provincial Vision: Scottish and American Literature in the Nineteenth Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

Richard Maxwell , ‘Inundations of Time: A Definition of Scott’s Originality’, ELH 68:2 (2001).

Caroline McCracken-Flesher , Possible Scotlands: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow, New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Murray G. H. Pittock , Poetry and Jacobite Politics in Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Kathryn Sutherland , ‘Fictional Economies: Adam Smith, Sir Walter Scott and the Nineteenth Century Novel’, ELH 54:1 (1987).

Peter Womack , Improvement and Romance: Constructing the Myth of the Highlands, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989.

Michael Gamer , Romanticism and the Gothic: Genre, Reception, and Canon Formation, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Gary Kelly , Women, Writing and Revolution, 1790–1827, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993.

Howard D. Weinbrot , Britannia’s Issue: The Rise of British Literature from Dryden to Ossian, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Ralph Pite , The Circle of our Vision: Dante’s Presence in English Romantic Poetry, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Massimiliano Demata , ‘Travel Literature in the Edinburgh Review’, in British Romanticism and the Edinburgh Review: Bicentenary Essays, ed. Massimiliano Demata and Duncan Wu , Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.

Mark Phillips , Society and Sentiment: Genres of Historical Writing in Britain, 1740–1820, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.

Roxann Wheeler , The Complexion of Race: Categories of Difference in Eighteenth-Century British Culture, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000.

Mark Phillipson , ‘Byron’s Revisited Haunts’, Studies in Romanticism 39 (Summer 2000).

R. J. Smith , The Gothic Bequest: Medieval Institutions in British Thought, 1688–1863, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Simon Bainbridge , British Poetry and the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars: Visions in Conflict, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Mary A. Favret , ‘Everyday War’, English Literary History 72 (2005).

Gillian Russell , Theatres of War: Performance, Politics and Society, 1793–1815, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.

C. Y. Ferdinand , Benjamin Collins and the Provincial Newspaper Trade in the Eighteenth Century, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997.

N. Fraistat , ‘Illegitimate Shelley: Radical Piracy and the Textual Edition as Cultural Performance’, PMLA 109:3 (1994).

L. Huett , ‘Among the Unknown Public: Household Words, All the Year Round, and the Mass-market Periodical in the Mid-Nineteenth Century’, Victorian Periodicals Review 38 (2005).

P. Keen , The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

I. McCalman (ed.), An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Derek Attridge , Peculiar Language: Literature as Difference, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1988.

Mary Jacobus , Romanticism, Writing, and Sexual Difference, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989.

Esther Schor , Bearing the Dead: The British Culture of Mourning from the Enlightenment to Victoria, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994.

David Simpson , Wordsworth and the Figurings of the Real, Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press, 1982.

Karen Swann ,‘Literary Gentlemen and Lovely Ladies: The Debate on the Character of Christabel’, ELH 52 (1985).

David Simpson , Irony and Authority in English Romantic Poetry, London: Macmillan, 1979.

E. J. Clery , The Rise of Supernatural Fiction, 1762–1800, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

J. A. Downie , ‘The Making of the English Novel’, Eighteenth-Century Fiction 9 (1997).

Ian Duncan , Modern Romance and Transformations of the Novel: The Gothic, Scott, Dickens, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Amanda Gilroy , and Wil Verhoeven , ‘Introduction: The Romantic-Era Novel: A Special Issue’, Novel: A Forum on Fiction 34 (2001).

Leah Price , The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

James Raven , Judging New Wealth: Popular Publishing and Responses to Commerce in England, 1750–1800, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992.

Nicola Watson , Revolution and the Form of the British Novel, 1790–1825, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994.

James Watt , Contesting the Gothic: Fiction, Genre and Cultural Conflict, 1764–1832, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Ian Dennis , Nationalism and Desire in Early Historical Fiction, London: Macmillan, 1997.

Deidre Lynch , ‘Gothic Libraries and National Subjects’, Studies in Romanticism 40 (2001).

Paul Magnusson , Reading Public Romanticism, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998.

Jacqueline Pearson , Women’s Reading in Britain, 1750–1835: A Dangerous Recreation, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Fiona Robertson , Legitimate Histories: Scott, Gothic, and the Authorities of Fiction, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994.

Catherine Burroughs , Closet Stages: Joanna Baillie and the Theater Theory of British Romantic Women Writers, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

David Mayer , Harlequin in His Element: The English Pantomime, 1806–1836, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1969.

Cyrus Hamlin , ‘The Origins of a Philosophical Genre Theory in German Romanticism’, European Romantic Review 5:1 (1994).

Tilottama Rajan , ‘Theories of Genre’, in The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism, vol. V: Romanticism, ed. Marshall Brown , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

John Clubbe , ‘The Tempest-toss’d Summer of 1816: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein’, The Byron Journal 19 (1991).

Humphry Davy , ‘Discourse Introductory to a Course of Lectures on Chemistry’ (1802), in The Collected Works of Humphry Davy, ed. John Davy , 9 vols., London: Smith, Elder, 1839–40, vol. II.

Adrian Desmond , ‘Artisan Resistance and Evolution in Britain, 1819–1848’, Osiris (2nd ser.) 3 (1987).

Jan Golinski , ‘Humphry Davy’s Sexual Chemistry’, Configurations 7 (1999).

Ian Inkster , ‘Science and Society in the Metropolis: A Preliminary Examination of the Social and Institutional Context of the Askesian Society of London, 1796–1807’, Annals of Science 34 (1977).

David Knight , ‘The Scientist as Sage’, Studies in Romanticism 6 (1967).

Martin J. S. Rudwick , Bursting the Limits of Time: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Revolution, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

Simon Schaffer ,‘Natural Philosophy and Public Spectacle in the Eighteenth Century’, History of Science 21 (1983).

Stuart Strickland ,‘The Ideology of Self-Knowledge and the Practice of Self-Experimentation’, Eighteenth-Century Studies 31 (1998).

Claudia L. Johnson , Equivocal Beings: Politics, Gender, and Sentimentality in the 1790s: Wollstonecraft, Radcliffe, Burney, Austen, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1995.

Margaret Russett , De Quincey’s Romanticism: Canonical Minority and the Forms of Transmission, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

William Wordsworth , The Prose Works of William Wordsworth, ed. W. J. B. Owen and Jane Worthington Smyser , Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1974.

Timothy Fulford , and James Kitson , Romanticism and Colonialism: Writing and Empire, 1780–1830, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Saree Makdisi , William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Jane Austen , Emma, ed. Richard Cronin , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Robert Hole , Pulpits, Politics and Public Order in England, 1760–1832, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.

Roy Porter , ‘The Enlightenment in England’, in The Enlightenment in National Context, ed. Roy Porter and Mikulas Teich , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981.

Richard Price , A Discourse on the Love of Our Country, in Political Writings, ed. D. O. Thomas , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Walter Jackson Bate , From Classic to Romantic, Harper and Row, 1946.

Carl Woodring , Politics in English Romantic Poetry, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1970.

Andrew Ashfield , and Peter de Bolla (eds.), ‘Irish Perspectives’, in The Sublime: A Reader in British Eighteenth-Century Aesthetic Theory, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Nina Auerbach , Communities of Women, Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 1978.

Marc Baer , Theatre and Disorder in Late Georgian London, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992.

T. C. W. Blanning , The Culture of Power and the Power of Culture, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

T. F. Bonnell , ‘John Bell’s Poets of Great Britain: The “little trifling edition” Revisited’, Modern Philology 85 (1987), 128–52.

J. H. Brooke , ‘Natural Theology and the Plurality of Worlds: Observations on the Brewster-Whewell Debate’, Annals of Science 34 (1977), 221–86.

J. H. Brooke ,‘Nebular Contraction and the Expansion of Naturalism’, British Journal for the History of Science 12 (1979), 200–11.

Homer Obed Brown , Institutions of the English Novel From Defoe to Scott, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

Marshall Brown , ‘Romanticism and Enlightenment’, in The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism, ed. Stuart Curran (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. 25–47.

Mary Ellen Brown , Burns and Tradition, Urbana: Illinois University Press, 1984.

Thomas Brown , Lectures on the Philosophy of the Human Mind, 4 vols., Edinburgh: W. and C. Tait, 1820.

Marilyn Butler , ‘Culture’s Medium: The Role of the Review’, The Cambridge Companion to Romanticism, ed. Stuart Curran , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, pp. 120–48.

W. F. Bynum , E. J. Browne and Roy Porter (eds.), Dictionary of the History of Science, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1981.

George Gordon Byron , The Complete Poetical Works, 7 vols., ed. Jerome McGann , Oxford: Clarendon Press and New York: Oxford University Press, 1980–93.

Geoffrey Cantor , ‘The Scientist as Hero: Public Images of Michael Faraday’, in Michael Shortland and Richard Yeo (eds.), Telling Lives in Science: Essays on Scientific Biography, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996, pp. 171–93.

Mark Canuel , Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790–1832, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Julie A. Carlson , In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism, Women, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994; pbk 2007.

Pamela Clemit , The Godwinian Novel: The Rational Fictions of Godwin, Brockden Brown, Mary Shelley, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993.

John Clive , Scotch Reviewers: The Edinburgh Review 1802–1815, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1957.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge , The Friend, in The Collected Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, vol. IV, ed. Barbara E. Rooke , Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press / London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1969.

Roger Cooter , and Stephen Pumfrey , ‘Separate Spheres and Public Places: Reflections on the History of Science Popularization and Science in Popular Culture’, History of Science 32 (1994), 237–67.

Edward Copeland , ‘Crossing Oxford Street: Silverfork Geopolitics’, Eighteenth-Century Life 25 (Spring 2001), 116–34.

Jeffrey N. Cox , ‘Lamia, Isabella, and The Eve of St. Agnes’, in The Cambridge Companion to John Keats, ed. Susan J. Wolfson , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001, pp. 53–68.

Stuart Curran (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Gregory Dart , Rousseau, Robespierre and English Romanticism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Leith Davis , Ian Duncan and Janet Sorensen (eds.), Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

P. M. S. Dawson , ‘Poetry in an Age of Revolution’, in The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism, ed. Stuart Curran , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, pp. 48–73.

Seamus Deane , The French Revolution and Enlightenment in England, 1789–1832, Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 1988.

Mary A. Favret ,‘War in the Air’, Modern Language Quarterly 65 (2004), 631–59.

J. Feather , A History of British Publishing, London: Routledge, 1988.

J. Feather , The Provincial Book Trade in Eighteenth-Century England, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985.

Ina Ferris , ‘Pedantry and the Question of Enlightenment History: The Figure of the Antiquary in Scott’, European Romantic Review 13 (2002), 273–83.

Penny Fielding , Writing and Orality: Nationality, Culture, and Nineteenth-Century Scottish Fiction, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Andrew Franta , Romanticism and the Rise of the Mass Public, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Tim Fulford , ‘Romanticizing the Empire: The Naval Heroes of Southey, Coleridge, Austen and Marryat’, Modern Language Quarterly 60 (1999), 161–96.

Tom Furniss , Edmund Burke’s Aesthetic Ideology: Language, Gender, and Political Economy in Revolution, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Mike Goode , ‘Dryasdust Antiquarianism and Soppy Masculinity: The Waverley Novels and the Gender of History’, Representations 82 (2003), 52–86.

J. Goodfield-Toulmin , ‘Some Aspects of English Physiology, 1780–1840’, Journal of the History of Biology 2 (1969), 283–320.

John Goodridge , and Bridget Keegan , ‘John Clare and the Traditions of Labouring-class Verse’, in The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1740–1830, ed. T. Keymer and J. Mee , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 280–95.

John Guillory , Cultural Capital: The Problem of Literary Canon Formation, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993.

Georg Hegel Wilhelm Friedrich , Aesthetics: Lectures on Fine Arts, 2 vols., trans. T. M. Knox , Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975.

Andrea Henderson , ‘Commerce and Masochistic Desire in the 1790s’, Eighteenth-Century Studies 31 (1997), 69–86.

Istvan Hont , and Michael Ignatieff (eds.), Wealth and Virtue: The Shaping of Political Economy in the Scottish Enlightenment, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.

L. S. Jacyna , ‘Immanence or Transcendence: Theories of Life and Organization in Britain, 1790–1835’, Isis 74 (1983), 310–29.

Simon Jarvis , Wordsworth’s Philosophic Song: Poetic Thinking in Wordsworth, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Steven E. Jones , Satire and Romanticism, New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000.

John Kandl , ‘The Politics of Keats’s Early Poetry’, in The Cambridge Companion to John Keats, ed. Susan J. Wolfson , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001, pp. 1–19.

Immanuel Kant , Critique of the Power of Judgement, trans. Paul Guyer and Eric Matthews , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

William Keach , Arbitrary Power: Romanticism, Language, Politics, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2004.

Thomas Keymer , and Jon Mee (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1740–1830, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Naum Kipnis , ‘Luigi Galvani and the Debate on Animal Electricity, 1791–1800’, Annals of Science 44 (1987), 107–42.

Greg Kucich , ‘Keats, Shelley, Byron, and the Hunt Circle’, in The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1740–1830, ed. Thomas Keymer and Jon Mee , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 263–79.

Nigel Leask ,‘Kubla Khan and Orientalism: The Road to Xanadu Revisited’, Romanticism 4:1 (1998).

Trevor H. Levere , Poetry Realized in Nature: Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Early Nineteenth-Century Science, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981.

Paul Magnuson , ‘The Lake School: Wordsworth and Coleridge’, in The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1740–1830, ed. Thomas Keymer and Jon Mee , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 227–43.

Saree Makdisi , Romantic Imperialism: Universal Empire and the Culture of Modernity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998).

Peter Manning ,‘Childe Harold in the Marketplace: From Romaunt to Handbook’, MLQ 52 (1991), 170–90.

Susan Manning , Fragments of Union: Making Connections in Scottish and American Writing, Houndmills: Palgrave, 2002.

Iain McCalman , ‘Controlling the Riots: Dickens and Romantic Revolution’, History 84 (July 1999), 458–74.

Jerome McGann , Byron and Romanticism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Maureen N. McLane , Romanticism and the Human Sciences: Poetry, Population, and the Discourse of the Species, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Jon Mee , ‘Blake and the Poetics of Enthusiasm’, in The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1740–1830, ed. Thomas Keymer and Jon Mee , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 194–210.

David Philip Miller , ‘ “Puffing Jamie”: The Commercial and Ideological Importance of being a “Philosopher” in the Case of the Reputation of James Watt (1736–1819)’, History of Science 38 (2000), 1–24.

Philip Mirowski (ed.), Natural Images in Economic Thought: Markets Red in Tooth and Claw, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

W. J. T. Mitchell , ‘Influence, Autobiography and Literary History: Rousseau’s Confessions and Wordsworth’s The Prelude’, ELH 57 (1990), 643–64.

Ayumi Mizukoshi , Keats, Hunt and the Aesthetics of Pleasure, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2001.

Jane Moody , and Daniel O’Quinn (eds.), Cambridge Companion to British Theatre, 1730–1830, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Dafydd Moore , ‘Ossian, Chivalry and the Politics of Genre’, British Journal of Eighteenth-Century Studies 23:1 (Spring 2000), 21–35.

J. B. Morrell , ‘Professors Robison and Playfair and the “Theophobia Gallica” ’, Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London 26 (1971), 43–63.

Peter Murphy , Poetry as an Occupation and an Art in Britain, 1760–1830, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Judith Pascoe , ‘ “Unsex’d females”: Barbauld, Robinson, and Smith’, in The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1740–1830, ed. Thomas Keymer and Jon Mee , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 211–26.

Mary Poovey , A History of the Modern Fact: Problems of Knowledge in the Sciences of Wealth and Society, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

Mary Louise Pratt , Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation, London: Routledge, 1992.

Magdalene Redekop , ‘Beyond Closure: Buried Alive with Hogg’s Justified Sinner’, ELH 52:1 (Spring 1985), 159–84.

John Hamilton Reynolds , Selected Prose, ed. Leonidas M. Jones , Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1966.

Robert J. Richards , The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Alan Richardson , Literature, Education and Romanticism: Reading as Social Practice, 1780–1832, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Roger Sales , Jane Austen and Representations of Regency England, London: Routledge, 1994.

Simon Schaffer ,‘Priestley’s Questions: An Historiographical Survey’, History of Science 22 (1984), 151–83.

Walter Scott , Waverley; or, ’Tis Sixty Years Since (1814), ed. Claire Lamont , Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981.

Michael Henry Scrivener , Radical Shelley, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1982.

Philip Shaw , Waterloo and the Romantic Imagination, Basingstoke, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.

David Simpson , ‘Romanticism, Criticism and Theory’, in The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism, ed. Stuart Curran , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, pp. 1–24.

Clifford Siskin ,‘The Year of the System’, in 1798: The Year of Lyrical Ballads, ed. Richard Cronin , Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998, pp. 9–31.

Adam Smith , The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), ed. D. D. Raphael and A. L. Macfie , Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence of Adam Smith, 6 vols., Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1976.

Bernard Smith , ‘Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner and Cook’s Second Voyage’, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 19 (1956), 117–54.

Jane Stabler , Byron, Poetics and History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

John Stevenson , ‘The London Riots of 1794’, International Review of Social History 16 (1971), 40–58.

Stuart Strickland , ‘Galvanic Disciplines: The Boundaries, Objects, and Identities of Experimental Science in the Era of Romanticism’, History of Science 33 (1995), 449–68.

J. Sutherland , Victorian Fiction: Writers, Publishers, Readers, London: MacMillan, 1995.

Karen Swann , ‘Endymion’s Beautiful Dreamers’, in The Cambridge Companion to John Keats, ed. Susan J. Wolfson , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001, pp. 20–36.

R. G. Swartz , ‘Wordsworth, Copyright, and the Commodities of Genius’, Modern Philology 89:4 (1992), 482–509.

Nanora Sweet , and Julie Melnyk (eds.), Felicia Hemans: Reimagining Poetry in the Nineteenth Century, New York: Palgrave, 2001.

Richard C. Taylor , ‘James Harrison, The Novelist’s Magazine, and the Early Canonizing of the English Novel’, Studies in English Literature 33 (1993), 629–43.

Robert Tracy , ‘Maria Edgeworth and Lady Morgan’, Nineteenth-Century Fiction 40 (1985), 1–22.

Amanda Vickery ,‘Golden Age to Separate Spheres: A Review of the Categories and Chronology of English Women’s History’, The Historical Journal 36:2 (1993), 383–414.

J. R. Watson , Romanticism and War: A Study of British Romantic Period Writers and the Napoleonic Wars, Basingstoke, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.

Matthew Wickman , The Ruins of Experience: Scotland’s ‘Romantick’ Highlands and the Birth of the Modern Witness, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.

Susan J. Wolfson ,‘What’s Wrong with Formalist Criticism?’, Studies in Romanticism 37 (Spring 1998), 77–94.

Susan J. Wolfson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to John Keats, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Robert Woof (ed.), William Wordsworth: The Critical Heritage, vol. I, London and New York: Routledge, 2001.

David Worrall , The Politics of Romantic Theatricality, 1787–1832: The Road to the Stage, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

Duncan Wu , ‘Keats and the “Cockney School”’, in The Cambridge Companion to John Keats, ed. Susan J. Wolfson , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001, pp. 37–54.

R. R. Yeo , ‘Genius, Method, and Morality: Early Victorian Images of Sir Isaac Newton’, Science in Context 2 (1988), 257–284.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 2053 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 2821 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 20th August 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.