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  • Print publication year: 2009
  • Online publication date: May 2009

17 - The new poetries

from Part III - Histories: Writing in the New Movements
Summary
Wordsworth went so far as to equate 'all good poetry' with 'the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings'. Lord Byron signatures were legibly classical: dramas set in the old unities of time, place and action; poetry, hewing to traditions of craft. In the poetics of sympathy, the genres turned inward. A poetry of gaps and indirections, of understatements and silences, required a new mode of reading, even a revolution of the kind that Jeffrey's impatience with the Ode intuited but was in no mood of mind to theorize. While Byron was working his new discoveries at home and then abroad, in 1817 a new periodical, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, launched a serial assault on a new London-suburbanism: 'The Cockney School of Poetry'. If the stories today credit its new poetries with a generative role in the history of English Literature, the old stories keep us alert to what Romantic-era poets and their readers knew, and knew not, as 'new'.
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The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature
  • Online ISBN: 9781139055970
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521790079
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.


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