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    This chapter has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Levine, John M. 2017. Factional conflict in groups: How majorities and minorities relate to one another. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Vol. 20, Issue. 5, p. 644.

    Anderson, Sian and Bigby, Christine 2017. Self-Advocacy as a Means to Positive Identities for People with Intellectual Disability: ‘We Just Help Them, Be Them Really’. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 30, Issue. 1, p. 109.

    Smith, Joanne R. Louis, Winnifred R. Schultz, P. Wesley Vernet, Jean Pierre Vala, Jorge and Butera, Fabrizio 2011. Can men promote feminist movements?. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Vol. 14, Issue. 5, p. 723.

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  • Print publication year: 2009
  • Online publication date: June 2012

14 - Influence without credit: How successful minorities respond to social cryptomnesia

Summary

In October 2007, the Nobel Committee awarded its Peace Prize jointly to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the American politician Al Gore “for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change” (Nobel Foundation, 2008). This award represented the first unambiguous statement by the Committee of the importance of defending the environment. True, the 2004 Peace Prize given to Wangari Maathai mentioned her contributions to sustainable development, but the primary criterion for the award was her work on behalf of “democracy, human rights and women's rights in particular” (Nobel Foundation, 2008). Thus, the 2007 award can be considered a milestone in the decades-old struggle to bring attention to the harmful effects of human activities on the environment, a recognition that environmentalists have been waiting for a long time.

Or can it? Are the ecology activists who have fought for the preservation of the environment for decades – by joining the words “green” and “peace”, by demonstrating in the streets, by chaining themselves to gates, by spending time in jail – pleased with the 2007 award? Do they feel happy with this highly visible recognition of the cause for which they have so long fought? Or do they feel bitter disappointment that the prize was awarded, not to one or more of their organizations, but instead to two relative newcomers to the cause – an intergovernmental panel and a professional politician?

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Coping with Minority Status
  • Online ISBN: 9780511804465
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511804465
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