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Fitness of the Cosmos for Life
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    Weber, Bruce 2010. Water and Life. p. 327.

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Book description

This highly interdisciplinary 2007 book highlights many of the ways in which chemistry plays a crucial role in making life an evolutionary possibility in the universe. Cosmologists and particle physicists have often explored how the observed laws and constants of nature lie within a narrow range that allows complexity and life to evolve and adapt. Here, these anthropic considerations are diversified in a host of new ways to identify the most sensitive features of biochemistry and astrobiology. Celebrating the classic 1913 work of Lawrence J. Henderson, The Fitness of the Environment for Life, this book looks at the delicate balance between chemistry and the ambient conditions in the universe that permit complex chemical networks and structures to exist. It will appeal to a broad range of scientists, academics, and others interested in the origin and existence of life in our universe.

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Review of the hardback:'… comprehensive … well referenced, and adequately indexed. … I would … recommend it to readers who are neither scientists, nor academics, nor theologians.'

Source: The Observatory

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Contents


Page 1 of 2


  • Preface
    pp xxi-xxii
    • By John D. Barrow, Professor of Mathematical Sciences in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge; Director, Millennium Mathematics Project, Simon Conway Morris, Professor of Evolutionary Palaeobiology, Earth Sciences Department, University of Cambridge, Stephen J. Freeland, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Charles L. Harper, Astrophysicist and planetary scientist and serves as Senior Vice President, John Templeton Foundation

Page 1 of 2


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