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The Legacy of Nazi Occupation
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  • Cited by 7
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Dolghin, Dana 2018. On political heritage: remembering and disavowing 1989. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, p. 1.

    Winter, Jay 2018. Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Genocide and Memory. p. 117.

    Winter, Jay 2014. Space and the Memories of Violence. p. 77.

    Venken, Machteld 2013. History, Memory and Politics in Central and Eastern Europe. p. 54.

    Hopkin, David 2009. The Bee and the Eagle. p. 214.

    Lehti, Marko Jutila, Matti and Jokisipilä, Markku 2008. Never-Ending Second World War: Public Performances of National Dignity and the Drama of the Bronze Soldier. Journal of Baltic Studies, Vol. 39, Issue. 4, p. 393.

    Winter, Jay 2006. Memory, Trauma and World Politics. p. 54.

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  • Pieter Lagrou, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris

Book description

This volume, in Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare series, examines how France, Belgium and the Netherlands emerged from the military collapse and humiliating Nazi occupation they suffered during the Second World War. Rather than traditional armed conflict, the human consequences of Nazi policies were resistance, genocide and labour migration to Germany. Pieter Lagrou offers a genuinely comparative approach to these issues, based on extensive archival research; he underlines the divergence between ambiguous experiences of occupation and the univocal post-war patriotic narratives which followed. His book reveals striking differences in political cultures as well as close convergence in the creation of a common Western European discourse, and uncovers disturbing aspects of the aftermath of the war, including post-war antisemitism and the marginalisation of resistance veterans. Brilliantly researched and fluently written, this book will be of central interest to all scholars and students of twentieth-century European history.

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