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Philosophy and Biodiversity
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  • Cited by 4
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Besek, Jordan F. and York, Richard 2018. Toward a Sociology of Biodiversity Loss. Social Currents, p. 232949651881586.

    Malaterre, Christophe 2013. Microbial diversity and the “lower-limit” problem of biodiversity. Biology & Philosophy, Vol. 28, Issue. 2, p. 219.

    Vadrot, Alice B.M. 2011. Biodiversity and society: why should social sciences have a say?. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, Vol. 24, Issue. 3, p. 211.

    O’Malley, Maureen A. and Dupré, John 2007. Size doesn’t matter: towards a more inclusive philosophy of biology. Biology & Philosophy, Vol. 22, Issue. 2, p. 155.

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Book description

This important collection focuses on the nature and importance of biodiversity. The concept is clarified and its intrinsic and instrumental value are discussed. Even though the term biodiversity was invented in the 1980s to promote the cause of species conservation, discussions on biological diversity go back to Plato. There are many controversies surrounding biodiversity and a few of them are examined here: What is worthy of protection or restoration and what is the acceptable level of costs? Is it permissible to kill sentient animals to promote native populations? Can species be reintroduced if they have disappeared a long time ago? How should the responsibilities for biodiversity be shared? This book will be of interest to philosophers of science and biologists, but also to anyone interested in conservation and the environment.

Reviews

'This collection is significant. Not only does it contain quite important and thoughtful essays by some of our most important and thoughtful conservation scholars, but the nuances that they adeptly articulate in their discussions of biodiversity are those that all environmental scholars, students, and activists should become familiar with.'

Source: Environmental Values

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