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The impact of migration experiences and migration identities on the experiences of services and caring for a family member with dementia for Sikhs living in Wolverhampton, UK

  • KARAN JUTLLA (a1)

Abstract

This article is based upon qualitative research carried out with members of the Sikh community caring for a person with dementia. Previous research with South Asian carers of people with dementia has reported problems with both access to, and use of, health and social care services namely due to cultural and language barriers within existing services. The research reported in this article sought for an in-depth understanding of the experiences of Sikhs caring for their family member with dementia. The aim of the research was to explore how migration experiences and life histories impact on perceptions and experiences of caring for a family member with dementia for Sikhs living in Wolverhampton in the West Midlands, United Kingdom. The research, undertaken by the author, applied a biographical approach using narrative interviews. Twelve Sikh carers of a family member with dementia were interviewed. Findings highlighted that migration experiences and migration identities are important for understanding participants’ experiences of services and experiences of caring for a family member with dementia. Person-centred dementia care as a model for practice highlights the importance of understanding life histories to support people to live well with dementia, including their family carers. This paper reinforces this message, demonstrating the impact of specific migration experiences on the experiences of caring for a family member with dementia.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Karan Jutlla, The Association for Dementia Studies, Bredon Building, St John's Campus, University of Worcester, Worcester WR2 6AJ, UK. E-mail: k.jutlla@worc.ac.uk

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Keywords

The impact of migration experiences and migration identities on the experiences of services and caring for a family member with dementia for Sikhs living in Wolverhampton, UK

  • KARAN JUTLLA (a1)

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