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Intergenerational flows of support between parents and adult children in Britain

  • MARIA EVANDROU (a1) (a2), JANE FALKINGHAM (a1), MADELIN GOMEZ-LEON (a1) and ATHINA VLACHANTONI (a1) (a2)
Abstract
ABSTRACT

Understanding patterns of intergenerational support is critical within the context of demographic change, such as changing family structures and population ageing. Existing research has focused on intergenerational support at a given time in the individuals' lifecourse, e.g. from adult children towards older parents and vice versa; however, few studies have focused on the dynamic nature of such support. Analysing data from the 1958 National Child Development Study, this paper investigates the extent to which the receipt of parental help earlier in the lifecourse affects the chances of adult children reciprocating with support towards their parents later in life. The findings show that three-quarters of mid-life adults had received some support from their parents earlier in life, and at age 50 more than half were providing care to their parents. Patterns of support received and provided across the lifecourse differ markedly by gender, with sons being more likely to have received help with finances earlier in the lifecourse, and daughters with child care. The results highlight that care provision towards parents was associated with support receipt earlier in life. However, the degree of reciprocity varies according to the type of care provided by children. Such findings have implications for informal care provision by adult children towards future cohorts of older people, and by extension, the organisation of social care.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Address for correspondence: Maria Evandrou, Centre for Research on Ageing and ESRC Centre for Population Change, Faculty of Social, Human and Mathematical Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK E-mail: maria.evandrou@soton.ac.uk
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Ageing & Society
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