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Floor Area and Settlement Population

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Raoul Naroll*
Affiliation:
San Fernando Valley State College, Northridge, Calif.

Abstract

Total area of the dwelling floors and total population of the largest settlements of eighteen societies show a loglog regression which suggests that the population of a prehistoric settlement can be very roughly estimated as of the order of one-tenth the floor area in square meters.

Type
Facts and Comments
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for American Archaeology 1962

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