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Weathering Cracks and Split-Line Patterns in Archaeological Bone

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

N. C. Tappen
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
G. Richard Peske
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Abstract

Post mortem cracks in bone produced by action of weather or other agencies which cause shrinkage have been shown to be oriented in the same direction as split-lines produced by decalcification and punctures with a needle. Archaeological bone also shows split-lines parallel to weathering cracks in cases where preservation of the collagenous matrix is good. Limb bones of birds tend to have better preservation than mammal bones in the Lasley"s Point site in Wisconsin. Considerable microscopic structure of bone is preserved where decalcification and split-line processing are possible.

Type
Reports
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for American Archaeology 1970

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References

Bender, Margaret M., Bryson, Reid A., and Baerreis, David A. 1966 University of Wisconsin radiocarbon dates II. Radiocarbon 8:522533.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bender, Margaret M., Bryson, Reid A., and Baerreis, David A. 1967 University of Wisconsin radiocarbon dates III. Radiocarbon 9:530544.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bullock, Harold R. 1942a Lasley Point Mound cruising. Wisconsin Archeologist 23:3236.Google Scholar
Bullock, Harold R. 1942b Lasley Point Mound excavations. Wisconsin Archeologist 23:3744.Google Scholar
Tappen, N. C. 1954 A comparative functional analysis of primate skulls by the split-line technique. Human Biology 26:220238.Google Scholar
Tappen, N. C. 1969 The relationship of weathering cracks to split-line orientation in bone. American Journal Of Physical Anthropology 31:191198.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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