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Human Rights and the Future of Being Human

  • Alexandra Huneeus (a1)
Extract

The seventieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) comes at a time of more contestation than usual over the future of human rights. A sense of urgency animates debates over whether the institutions and ideas of human rights can, or should, survive current geopolitical changes. This symposium, by contrast, shifts the lens to a more slow-moving but equally profound challenge to human rights law: how technology and its impacts on our social and physical environments are reshaping the debate on what it means to be human. Can the UDHR be recast for a time in which new technologies are continually altering how humans interact, and the legal status of robots, rivers, and apes alike are at times argued in the language of rights?

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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1 European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs, Report with Recommendations to the Commission on Civil Law Rules on Robotics, A8-0005/2017 (Jan. 27, 2018).

4 See, e.g., Corte Constitucional [C.C.] [Costitutional Court], abril 5, 2018, Sentencia T-622/16, Gaceta de la Corte Constitucional [G.C.C.] (Colom.).

5 Universal Declaration of Human Rights pmbl., G.A. Res. 217 (III) A (Dec. 10, 1948).

6 Id.

8 Charles Malik, Speech on Human Rights, delivered to United States Chamber of Commerce in New York (Nov. 4, 1949).

9 Molly K. Land, Speech Duties, 112 AJIL Unbound 329 (2018).

11 Catherine Powell, Race and Rights in the Digital Age, 112 AJIL Unbound 339 (2018).

12 R. Alta Charo, Germline Engineering and Human Rights, 112 AJIL Unbound 344 (2018).

15 Agi Marc, René Cassin: Fantassin des Froits de L'Homme (1979); Mary Ann Glendon, A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights ch. 11(2001).

17 Alison Brysk, The Future of Human Rights (2018); Human Rights Futures (Stephen Hopgood et al. eds., 2017); Michael Ignatieff, The Ordinary Virtues (2017); Samuel Moyn, Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World (2018); Kathryn Sikkink, Evidence for Hope: Making Human Rights Work in the 21st Century (2017). But see Uprenda Baxi, Human Rights in a Post Human World (2007).

18 But see 9 Law & Ethics Hum. Rts. (2015).

19 See, e.g., New Technologies for Human Rights Law and Practice (Molly Land & Jay D. Aronson eds., 2018); New Technologies and Human rights (Therese Murphy ed., 2009).

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AJIL Unbound
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2398-7723
  • URL: /core/journals/american-journal-of-international-law
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