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Lipstick and Logarithms: Gender, Institutional Context, and Representative Bureaucracy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 November 2002

LAEL R. KEISER
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri—Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (keiserl@missouri.edu).
VICKY M. WILKINS
Affiliation:
PhD candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Missouri—Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (vmw9aa@missouri.edu).
KENNETH J. MEIER
Affiliation:
Charles Puryear Professor of Liberal Arts, Sara Lindsey Chair of Government and Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science and George Bush School of Government, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (kmeier@politics.tamu.edu).
CATHERINE A. HOLLAND
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Program in Women's Studies, University of Missouri—Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (hollandc@missouri.edu).

Abstract

According to the theory of representative bureaucracy, passive representation among public employees will lead to active representation in bureaucratic outputs. Existing research demonstrates that the link between passive and active representation exists for race but not for sex. Past research on this topic has not, however, taken into account the contextual environment that affects whether sex will translate into gender and lead to active representation in the bureaucracy. In this paper, we create a framework that specifies the conditions that affect whether passive representation results in active representation for sex and then test this framework using the case of education. We find that passive representation of women in education leads to active representation and that the institutional context affects the extent to which this link between passive and active representation occurs.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 by the American Political Science Association

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