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Heat-treatment, phytase and fermented liquid feeding affect the presence of inositol phosphates in ileal digesta and phosphorus digestibility in pigs fed a wheat and barley diet

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2010

K. Blaabjerg*
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Health and Bioscience, Aarhus University, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark Faculty of Life Sciences, Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 3, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
H. Jørgensen
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Health and Bioscience, Aarhus University, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark
A.-H. Tauson
Affiliation:
Faculty of Life Sciences, Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 3, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
H. D. Poulsen
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Health and Bioscience, Aarhus University, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark
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Abstract

The aim was to evaluate the effect of heat-treatment, microbial phytase addition and feeding strategy (dry feeding v. fermented liquid feeding) on degradation of phytate (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6) and formation and further degradation of lower inositol phosphates (myo-inositol pentakisphosphate–myo-inositol bisphosphate, InsP5–InsP2) at the distal ileum of pigs. Furthermore, the apparent ileal digestibility/degradability (AID) of phosphorus (P), InsP6–P and calcium (Ca) and the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of P and Ca were studied. Pigs were fitted with a T-shaped ileal cannula for total collection of digesta at 2 h intervals during an 8 h sampling period after feeding the morning meal. Each period lasted for 2 weeks: 8 days of adaptation followed by 3 days of total collection of faeces and 3 days of total collection of ileal digesta. The experiment was designed as a 4 × 4 Latin square with four pigs fed four diets. A basal wheat/barley-based diet was fed either as non-heat-treated or heat-treated (steam-pelleted at 90°C). The heat-treatment resulted in an inactivation of plant phytase below detectable level. Diet 1 (non-heat-treated basal diet fed dry); diet 2 (heat-treated basal diet fed dry); diet 3 (as diet 2 but with microbial phytase (750 FTU/kg as fed) fed dry); diet 4 (as diet 3 fed liquid (fermented for 17.5 h nighttime and 6.5 h daytime at 20°C with 50% residue in the tank)). Chromic oxide (Cr2O3) was included as marker and ATTD was determined both by total collection of faeces (ATTDTotal) and Cr2O3 (ATTDCr). InsP6 was completely degraded in diet 4 before feeding resulting in no InsP6–P being present in ileal digesta. InsP6–P concentration in ileal digesta decreased with increasing dietary levels of plant or microbial phytase in pigs fed the dry diets. Consequently, AID and ATTD of P and Ca were greatest for pigs fed diet 4 followed by diets 3, 1 and 2. The ATTD of P depended on the used method as ATTDTotal of P was 72%, 61%, 44% and 34%, whereas ATTDCr of P was 65%, 52%, 38% and 23% for diets 4, 3, 1 and 2, respectively. In all pigs the ileal concentration of InsP5–InsP2–P was extremely small, and thus unimportant for maximisation of ATTD of plant P. In conclusion, fermented liquid feeding with microbial phytase seems to be an efficient approach to improve ATTD of plant P compared with dry feeding. This opens up for further reductions in P excretion.

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Copyright
Copyright © The Animal Consortium 2010

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Heat-treatment, phytase and fermented liquid feeding affect the presence of inositol phosphates in ileal digesta and phosphorus digestibility in pigs fed a wheat and barley diet
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