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Synchronising the availability of amino acids and glucose increases protein retention in pigs

  • J. J. G. C. van den Borne (a1), J. W. Schrama (a1) (a2), M. J. W. Heetkamp (a2), M. W. A. Verstegen (a1) and W. J. J. Gerrits (a1) (a2)...
Abstract

Effects of synchronising the availability of amino acids and glucose within a day on protein and energy metabolism were studied in growing pigs. Ten pigs of on average 54 (s.e. 1.0) kg live weight were assigned to each of two dietary treatments (synchronous v. asynchronous nutrient supply) in a change-over design. On the synchronous treatment (SYN), pigs received two balanced meals: one at 0800 h and one at 1600 h. On the asynchronous treatment (ASYN), pigs received virtually all protein at 0800 h and all carbohydrates at 1600 h. The dietary supply of ingredients and nutrients to pigs was similar for both treatments. Pigs were housed individually in respiration chambers. Faecal apparent nutrient digestibility was determined and nitrogen and energy balances were measured. Faecal apparent digestibility of energy, organic matter and non-starch polysaccharides was higher ( P < 0.05) for SYN than for ASYN. The efficiency of utilisation of digestible protein with protein gain was higher ( P = 0.001) for SYN (56.7%) than for ASYN (47.1%). The substantial decrease ( P < 0.05) in respiratory quotient and 13C enrichment of the expired CO2 after the morning meal indicated higher amino acid oxidation for ASYN than for SYN. Heat production and energy retention as fat were not affected by nutrient synchrony. In conclusion, an asynchronous availability of glucose and amino acids within a day increases amino acid oxidation, resulting in a substantial reduction in protein utilisation but with virtually no effect on fat retention.

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References
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