Skip to main content
×
Home

Initial results of the SeaRISE numerical experiments with the models SICOPOLIS and IcIES for the Greenland ice sheet

  • Ralf Greve (a1), Fuyuki Saito (a2) and Ayako Abe-Ouchi (a3)
Abstarct
Abstarct

SeaRISE (Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution) is a US-led multi-model community effort to predict the likely range of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea-level rise over the next few hundred years under global warming conditions. The Japanese ice-sheet modelling community is contributing to SeaRISE with two large-scale, dynamic/thermodynamic models: SICOPOLIS and IcIES. Here we discuss results for the Greenland ice sheet, obtained using both models under the forcings (surface temperature and precipitation scenarios) defined by the SeaRISE effort. A crucial point for meaningful simulations into the future is to obtain initial conditions that are close to the observed state of the present-day ice sheet. This is achieved by proper tuning during model spin-up from the last glacial/interglacial cycle to today. Experiments over 500 years indicate that both models are more sensitive (exhibit a larger rate of ice-sheet mass loss) to future climate warming (based on the A1B emission scenario) than to a doubling in the basal sliding speed. Ice-sheet mass loss varies between the two models by a factor of ~2 for sliding experiments and a factor of ~3 for climate-warming experiments, highlighting the importance of improved constraints on the parameterization of basal sliding and surface mass balance in ice-sheet models.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Initial results of the SeaRISE numerical experiments with the models SICOPOLIS and IcIES for the Greenland ice sheet
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Initial results of the SeaRISE numerical experiments with the models SICOPOLIS and IcIES for the Greenland ice sheet
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Initial results of the SeaRISE numerical experiments with the models SICOPOLIS and IcIES for the Greenland ice sheet
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
Aschwanden A., Khroulev C. and Bueler E.. 2009. SeaRISE Greenland – on ‘spin-up’ procedures. [Abstract C23B-0500]. Eos , 90(52), Fall Meet. Suppl.
Calov R. and Greve R.. 2005. Correspondence. A semi-analytical solution for the positive degree-day model with stochastic temperature variations. J. Glaciol. , 51(172), 173–175.
Dansgaard W. and 10 others. 1993. Evidence for general instability of past climate from a 250 kyr ice-core record. Nature , 364(6434), 218–220.
Ettema J. and 6 others. 2009. Higher surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet revealed by high-resolution climate modelling. Geophys. Res. Lett. , 36(L12), L12501. (10.1029/ 2009GL038110.)
Fausto R.S., Ahlstrøm A.P., van As D., Bøggild C.E. and Johnsen S.J.. 2009. A new present-day temperature parameterization for Greenland. J. Glaciol. , 55(189), 95–105.
Greve R. 1997. Application of a polythermal three-dimensional ice sheet model to the Greenland ice sheet: response to steady-state and transient climate scenarios. J. Climate , 10(5), 901–918.
Greve R. 2005. Relation of measured basal temperatures and the spatial distribution of the geothermal heat flux for the Greenland ice sheet. Ann. Glaciol. , 42, 424–432.
Greve R. and Blatter H.. 2009. Dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers. Berlin, etc., Springer.
Greve R., Weis M. and Hutter K.. 1998. Palaeoclimatic evolution and present conditions of the Greenland ice sheet in the vicinity of Summit: an approach by large-scale modelling. Palaeoclimates , 2(2–3), 133–161.
Howat I.M., Joughin I.R. and Scambos. T.A. 2007. Rapid changes in ice discharge from Greenland outlet glaciers. Science , 315(5818), 1559–1561.
Hutter K. 1983. Theoretical glaciology: material science of ice and the mechanics of glaciers and ice sheets. Dordrecht, etc., D. Reidel Publishing Co./Tokyo, Terra Scientific Publishing Co.
Huybrechts P. 2002. Sea-level changes at the LGM from ice-dynamic reconstructions of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets during the glacial cycles. Quat. Sci. Rev. , 21(1–3), 203–231.
Huybrechts P. and de Wolde J.. 1999. The dynamic response of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to multiple-century climatic warming. J. Climate , 12(8), 2169–2188.
Imbrie J. and 8 others. 1984. The orbital theory of Pleistocene climate: support from a revised chronology of the marine δ18O record. In Berger A., Imbrie J., Hays J., Kukla G. and Saltzman B., eds. Milankovitch and climate: understanding the response to astronomical forcing. Part 1. Dordrecht, etc., D. Reidel Publishing Co., 269–305.
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). 2007. Summary for policymakers. In Solomon S. and 7 others, eds. Climate change 2007: the physical science basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge, etc., Cambridge University Press.
Johnsen S.J. and 14 others. 1997. The δ18O record along the Greenland Ice Core Project deep ice core and the problem of possible Eemian climatic instability. J. Geophys. Res. , 102(C12), 26,397–26,410.
Joughin I. and 8 others. 2008. Ice-front variation and tidewater behavior on Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq Glaciers, Greenland. J. Geophys. Res. , 113(F1), F01004. (10.1029/ 2007JF000837.)
Lemke P. and 10 others. 2007. Observations: changes in snow, ice and frozen ground. In Solomon S. and 7 others, eds. Climate change 2007: the physical science basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge, etc., Cambridge University Press, 337–383.
Marsiat I. 1994. Simulation of the northern hemisphere continental ice sheets over the last glacial–interglacial cycle: experiments with a latitude–longitude vertically integrated ice sheet model coupled to zonally averaged climate model. Paleoclimates , 1, 59–98.
Meehl G.A. and 12 others. 2007. Global climate projections. In Solomon S. and 7 others, eds. Climate change 2007: the physical science basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge, etc., Cambridge University Press, 747–845.
Morland L.W. 1984. Thermomechanical balances of ice sheet flows. Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. , 29(1–4), 237–266.
Reeh N. 1991. Parameterization of melt rate and surface temperature on the Greenland ice sheet. Polarforschung , 59(3), 113–128.
Rignot E. and Kanagaratnam P.. 2006. Changes in the velocity structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Science , 311(5673), 986–990.
Ritz C. 1987. Time dependent boundary conditions for calculation of temperature fields in ice sheets. IAHS Publ. 170 (Symposium at Vancouver 1987 – The Physical Basis of Ice Sheet Modelling), 207–216.
Saito F. and Abe-Ouchi A.. 2005. Sensitivity of Greenland ice sheet simulation to the numerical procedure employed for ice-sheet dynamics. Ann. Glaciol. , 42, 331–336.
Saito F. and Abe-Ouchi A.. 2010. Modelled response of the volume and thickness of the Antarctic ice sheet to the advance of the grounded area. Ann. Glaciol. , 51(55), 41–48.
Shapiro N.M. and Ritzwoller M.H.. 2004. Inferring surface heat flux distribution guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 233(1–2), 213–224.
Tarasov L. and Peltier W.R.. 2002. Greenland glacial history and local geodynamic consequences. Geophys. J. Int. , 150(1), 198–229.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Annals of Glaciology
  • ISSN: 0260-3055
  • EISSN: 1727-5644
  • URL: /core/journals/annals-of-glaciology
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 9 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 18 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 14th September 2017 - 13th December 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.