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Kurgans and nomads: new investigations of mound burials in the southern Urals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

N.L. Morgunova
Affiliation:
1Orenburg Pedagogical State University, Laboratory of Archaeology, Ulitsa Sovetskaya, 19, Orenburg, 460014, Russia
O.S. Khokhlova
Affiliation:
2Institute of Physical, Chemical and Biological Problems of Soil Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region, 142290, Russia (Email: akhokhlov@mail.ru)

Extract

A new study of the group of kurgans (burial mounds) which stands near Orenburg at the south end of the Ural mountains has revealed a sequence that began in the early Bronze Age and continued intermittently until the era of the Golden Horde in the Middle Ages. The application of modern techniques of cultural and environmental investigation has thrown new light on the different circumstances and contexts in which mound burial was practised, and confirmed the association between investment in burial and nomadism.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 2006

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References

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