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Reply to Doppler et al. ‘Response to “The fall of Phaethon: a Greco-Roman geomyth preserves the memory of a meteorite impact in Bavaria (south-east Germany) (Antiquity 84)”’

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Barbara Rappenglück*
Affiliation:
Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, Bahnhofstrasse 1, Gilching, 82205, Germany
Michael A. Rappenglück
Affiliation:
Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, Bahnhofstrasse 1, Gilching, 82205, Germany
Kord Ernstson
Affiliation:
Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Am Judengarten 23, Höchberg, Germany
Werner Mayer
Affiliation:
Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, Bahnhofstrasse 1, Gilching, 82205, Germany
Andreas Neumair
Affiliation:
Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, Bahnhofstrasse 1, Gilching, 82205, Germany
Dirk Sudhaus
Affiliation:
Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Institut für Physische Geographie, Freiburg, Germany
Ioannis Liritzis
Affiliation:
Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, Dimokratias 1, Rhodes, Greece

Extract

We acknowledge the observations of Doppler et al. on our paper and we are grateful to Antiquity's editor for this opportunity to reply to their objections.

Firstly, it should be noted that we have not claimed that the Chiemsee once included the Tüttensee. We agree that the region in which both lakes lie was glacially formed. But while Lake Chiemsee is the result of the last Ice Age the Tüttensee basin originates from a much later Holocene meteorite impact. We do not use the myth of Phaeton to date this event that is known as the Chiemgau impact. On the contrary we estimate from archaeological evidence and OSL dating that the event occurred between 2200 and 800 BC, i.e. the Bronze Age (Rappenglück et al. 2010: 436).We go on to discuss parallels between the independent dating of the Chiemgau impact and the possible time frame of the myth (Rappenglück et al. 2010: 435–37).

Type
Research article
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd 2011

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References

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