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Cosmology, calendars and society in Neolithic Orkney: a rejoinder to Euan MacKie

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Clive Ruggles
Affiliation:
School of Archaeological Studies, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, England, rug@le.ac.uk
Gordon Barclay
Affiliation:
Historic Scotland, Longmore House, Salisbury Place, Edinburgh EH9 1SH, Scotland, Gordon.Barclay@Scotland.gov.uk
Corresponding
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Abstract

The authors examine critically MacKie's long-standing contentions concerning Neolithic Britain — theocratic control of society, the relationships between monuments and sunrise or sunset on significant days of the year, the use of an ‘elaborate and accurate’ solar calendar and its survival into the Iron Age and into modern times.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 2000

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