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Dig in: an evaluation of the role of archaeological fieldwork for the improved wellbeing of military veterans

  • Paul Everill (a1), Richard Bennett (a2) and Karen Burnell (a3)

Abstract

In 2011, Operation Nightingale was established to promote archaeology as a means to support the wellbeing and recovery of serving military personnel and veterans. Since then, the number of opportunities for participation has increased enormously. This article seeks to contextualise the current landscape of ‘rehabilitation archaeology’ for military personnel and veterans, through the presentation of data from the largest service evaluation to be based on standardised psychological measures undertaken to date. The results demonstrate improvements in wellbeing among veterans participating in fieldwork in 2018, including a reduction in the occurrence of anxiety, depression and feelings of isolation, and a greater sense of being valued.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: ✉ paul.everill@winchester.ac.uk

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Keywords

Dig in: an evaluation of the role of archaeological fieldwork for the improved wellbeing of military veterans

  • Paul Everill (a1), Richard Bennett (a2) and Karen Burnell (a3)

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