Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

An early medieval dual-currency economy: bullion and coin in the Danelaw

  • Jane Kershaw (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

Metal detecting in England has recovered a large number of Viking Age single finds that have been reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme. These reveal that silver bullion of Scandinavian origin was used as currency throughout the Danelaw between AD 865 and 940. Standardised weights of copper alloy were an integral part of this metal-weight economy. Bullion was not the sole means of silver payment during this period: coinage had long been used in the occupied Anglo-Saxon territories and continued to be minted under the Vikings. The resulting dual-currency economy may have facilitated trade with neighbouring Scandinavian territories, but the two currencies also served as markers of cultural identity, offering a choice of monetary media.

Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

A.H. Bevan 2012. Spatial methods for analysing large-scale artefact inventories. Antiquity 86: 492506. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0003598X0006289X

B.W. Frier & D. Kehoe . 2007. Law and economic institutions, in I. Morris , W. Scheidel & R. Saller (ed.) The Cambridge economic history of the Greek and Roman world: 113–43. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521780537.006

D. Hadley & J.D. Richards (ed.). 2000. Cultures in contact. Scandinavian settlement in England in the ninth and tenth centuries. Turnhout: Brepols.

J. Kershaw 2009. Culture and gender in the Danelaw: Scandinavian and Anglo-Scandinavian brooches. Viking and Medieval Scandinavia 5: 295325. http://dx.doi.org/10.1484/J.VMS.1.100682

J. Kershaw 2013. Viking identities: Scandinavian jewellery in England. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

J.H. Kroll 2008. The monetary use of weighed bullion in Archaic Greece, in W.V. Harris (ed.) The monetary systems of the Greeks and Romans: 1237. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

S. Kruse 1988. Ingots and weight units in Viking Age silver hoards. World Archaeology 20: 285301. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00438243.1988.9980073

A. Kuroda 2008. What is complementarity among monies? An introductory note. Financial History Review 15: 715. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0968565008000024

R. Naismith 2013. The English monetary economy, c. 973–1100: the contribution of single-finds. Economic History Review 66: 198225. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0289.2011.00650.x

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Type Description Title
UNKNOWN
Supplementary Materials

Kershaw supplementary material
Kershaw supplementary material 1

 Unknown (12 KB)
12 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary Materials

Kershaw supplementary material
Kershaw supplementary material 2

 Unknown (10 KB)
10 KB
PDF
Supplementary Materials

Kershaw supplementary material
Kershaw supplementary material 5

 PDF (220 KB)
220 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary Materials

Kershaw supplementary material
Kershaw supplementary material 4

 Unknown (12 KB)
12 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary Materials

Kershaw supplementary material
Kershaw supplementary material 3

 Unknown (14 KB)
14 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 20
Total number of PDF views: 156 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 1368 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th January 2017 - 23rd August 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.