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Dying to serve: the mass burials at Kerma

  • Margaret Judd (a1) and Joel Irish (a2)
Abstract

High ranking burial mounds in Bronze Age Sudan featured burials in a corridor leading to the central burial – supposedly of a king. Were the ‘corridor people’ prisoners captured during periodic raids on Egypt, or local retainers who followed their king in death? The authors use the skeletal material to argue the second hypothesis – coincidentally that advanced by George Reisner, the original excavator.

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References
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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
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