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EDITORIAL

  • Chris Scarre (a1)
Extract

One of the recurrent patterns in the Eurasian past is the tension between the steppe and the sown—between the nomadic peoples occupying the grassland belt from the Ukraine to China, and the settled farmers living along their southern margins. Peoples of the steppe have featured regularly in recent issues of Antiquity: the bronze-working traditions of the eastern steppes (Hsu et al. 2016) 1 , Andronovo settlement in Xinjiang (Jia et al. 2017) 2 , the Yamnaya people of the western steppes (Heyd 2017; Kristiansen 2017) 3,4 , or animal husbandry in the southern oases (Lhuillier et al. 2017) 5 . The more nomadic the lifestyle, the fewer the archaeological traces one might expect to find; but for some steppe peoples, those traces are nonetheless spectacular. And for none is that truer than for the Scythians, subject of the current major exhibition at the British Museum.

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References
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1 Hsu Y.-K., Bray P.J., Hommel P., Pollard A. Mark & Rawson J.. 2016. Tracing the flows of copper and copper alloys in the Early Iron Age societies of the eastern Eurasian steppe. Antiquity 90: 357–75. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2016.22

2 Jia P.W., Betts A., Cong D., Jia X. & Dupuy P.D.. 2017. Adunqiaolu: new evidence for the Andronovo in Xinjiang, China. Antiquity 91: 621–39. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.67

3 Heyd V. 2017. Kossinna's smile. Antiquity 91: 348–59. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.21

4 Kristiansen K., Allentoft M.E., Frei K.M., Iversen R., Johannsen N.N., Kroonen G., Ł. Price Pospieszny, T.D., Rasmussen S., Sjögren K.-G., Sikora M. & Willerslev E.. 2017. Re-theorising mobility and the formation of culture and language among the Corded Ware Culture in Europe. Antiquity 91: 334–47. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.17

5 Lhuillier J. & Mashkour M.. 2017. Animal exploitation in the oases: an archaeozoological review of Iron Age sites in southern Central Asia. Antiquity 91: 655–73. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.62

6 Allard F. & Erdenebaatar D.. 2005. Khirigsuurs, ritual and mobility in the Bronze Age of Mongolia. Antiquity 2005: 547–63. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003598X00114498

7 Shishlina N., Pankova S., Sevastyanov V., Kuznetsova O. & Demidenko Yu.. 2016. Pastoralists and mobility in the Oglakhty cemetery of southern Siberia: new evidence from stable isotopes. Antiquity 90: 679–94. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2016.92

8 Fernández-Götz M. 2016. ‘Celts: art and identity’ exhibition: ‘New Celticism’ at the British Museum. Antiquity 90: 237–44. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2015.193

9 Jantzen D., Brinker U., Orschiedt J. & Heinemeier J.. 2011. A Bronze Age battlefield? Weapons and trauma in the Tollense Valley, north-eastern Germany. Antiquity 85: 417–33. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003598X00067843

10 Berggren A., Dell'Unto N., Forte M., Haddow S., Hodder I., Issavi J., Lercari N., Mazzucato C., Mickel A. & Taylor J.S.. 2015. Revisiting reflexive archaeology at Çatalhöyük: integrating digital and 3D technologies at the trowel's edge. Antiquity 89: 433–48. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2014.43

11 Monmonier M. 2004. Rhumb lines and map wars: a social history of the Mercator Projection: p. 147. Chicago (IL): University of Chicago Press .

12 Müller S. 2010. Equal representation of time and space: Arno Peters’ Universal History’. History Compass 8: 718–29.

13 Müller. Equal representation of time and space: Arno Peters’ Universal History’, p. 722.

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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
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