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Evidence for early human occupation at high altitudes in western Central Asia: the Alay site

  • Svetlana Shnaider (a1) (a2), William T. Taylor (a2), Aida Abdykanova (a3), Ksenia Kolobova (a1) and Andrei Krivoshapkin (a1)...
Abstract

The Alay site represents the earliest, high-altitude human-occupation site currently known in western Central Asia. Recent recovery and analysis of a lithic assemblage from Alay underlines the importance of this site and its role in the cultural and technological development in later Eurasian prehistory.

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Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence (Email: sveta.shnayder@gmail.com)
References
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Bae, C.J., Douka, K. & Petraglia, M.. 2017. On the origin of modern humans: Asian perspectives. Science 358. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aai9067
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Ranov, V.A., Filimonova, T.G. & Nikonov, A.A.. 2015. Alay site, in Derevianko, A.P. & Shun'kov, M.V. (ed.) Coming back to beginnings: 196206. Novosibirsk: IAET SO RAN.
Shnaider, S.V., Krajcarz, M.T., Viola, T.B., Abdykanova, A., Kolobova, K.A., Fedorchenko, A. Yu., Alisher-Kyzy, S. & Krivoshapkin, A.I.. 2017. New investigations of Epipalaeolithic in western Central Asia: Obishir-5. Antiquity Project Gallery 91 (360). https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.213
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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
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