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The Keimoes 3 desert kite site, South Africa: an aerial lidar and micro-topographic exploration

  • Marlize Lombard (a1), Matthew V. Caruana (a1), Jaco van der Walt (a1) and Anders Högberg (a1) (a2)

Abstract

So-called desert kites have been found widely in the Middle East and Central Asia. The newly discovered Keimoes 3 site in the Nama Karoo, however, represents one of only three known desert kite sites in southern Africa. The complex comprises 14 funnels arranged in three groups around a small hill. Radiocarbon dates for structures in the region suggest a relative age for the kites of less than 2000 years. The authors demonstrate how strategic use of the site's micro-topography optimised game harvesting, and argue that Keimoes 3 offers robust evidence of Holocene Stone Age hunters engaging in long-term landscape modification as part of their subsistence strategies.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: ✉ anders.hogberg@lnu.se

References

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The Keimoes 3 desert kite site, South Africa: an aerial lidar and micro-topographic exploration

  • Marlize Lombard (a1), Matthew V. Caruana (a1), Jaco van der Walt (a1) and Anders Högberg (a1) (a2)

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