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‘Monumental Myopia’: bringing the later prehistoric settlements of southern Siberia into focus

  • Peter Hommel (a1), Olga Kovaleva (a2), Jade Whitlam (a1), Petr Amzarakov (a2), John Pouncett (a1), Jonathan Lim (a1), Natalia Petrova (a3), Chris Gosden (a1) and Yury Esin (a2)...

Abstract

The ‘Monumental Myopia’ project uses multiscalar remote-sensing techniques to identify potential prehistoric nomadic settlements in the Siberian landscape. Eschewing the monumental burial mounds, the project aims to explore the everyday life of pastoral societies in the first millennium BC.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence ✉ peter.hommel@arch.ox.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

‘Monumental Myopia’: bringing the later prehistoric settlements of southern Siberia into focus

  • Peter Hommel (a1), Olga Kovaleva (a2), Jade Whitlam (a1), Petr Amzarakov (a2), John Pouncett (a1), Jonathan Lim (a1), Natalia Petrova (a3), Chris Gosden (a1) and Yury Esin (a2)...

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