Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Of mammoths and other monsters: historic approaches to the submerged Palaeolithic

  • Rachel Bynoe (a1), Justin K. Dix (a2) and Fraser Sturt (a1)

Abstract

Recent research on the submerged central and southern North Sea basin has focused on the end of the story: the last few millennia before the final inundation. Much older deposits do survive, however, and are documented by collections of Pleistocene fauna recovered by fishing fleets operating from Dutch and British ports during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Analysis of the British collections allows them to be assigned to specific areas of seabed and to broad stages of the Pleistocene climatic sequence. The results provide evidence of more complex and fragmentary undersea landscapes than can be detected using geophysical approaches alone, and indicate targeted areas for future work.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Of mammoths and other monsters: historic approaches to the submerged Palaeolithic
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Of mammoths and other monsters: historic approaches to the submerged Palaeolithic
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Of mammoths and other monsters: historic approaches to the submerged Palaeolithic
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence (Email: rachel.bynoe@soton.ac.uk)

References

Hide All
Ashton, N. & Lewis, S.. 2012. The environmental contexts of early human occupation of northwest Europe: the British Lower Palaeolithic record. Quaternary International 271: 5064. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2011.10.022
Breda, M., Collinge, S.E., Parfitt, S.A. & Lister, A.. 2010. Metric analysis of ungulate mammals in the early Middle Pleistocene of Britain, in relation to taxonomy and biostratigraphy I: Rhinocerotidae and Bovidae. Quaternary International 228: 136–56. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2010.05.010
Bridgland, D.R. 1994. Quaternary of the Thames. London: Chapman & Hall. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-0705-1
Butcher, D. 1980. The trawlermen. Reading: Tops'l.
Butcher, D. 1985. From the catcher's angle. Report produced for Defra, London.
Bynoe, R. 2014. The great fossil mine of the southern North Sea: exploring the potential of submerged Palaeolithic archaeology. Unpublished PhD dissertation, University of Southampton.
Cameron, T., Crosby, A., Balson, P., Jeffery, D., Lott, G., Bulat, J. & Harrison, D.. 1992. The geology of the southern North Sea. London: HM Stationery Office.
Candy, I. & Schreve, D.C.. 2007. Land-sea correlation of Middle Pleistocene temperate sub-stages using high-precision uranium-series dating for tufa deposits from southern England. Quaternary Science Reviews 26: 1223–35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2007.01.012
Clark, J.D. 1936. The Mesolithic settlement of Northern Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Cohen, K., Gibbard, P. & Weerts, H.. 2014. North Sea palaeogeographical reconstructions for the last 1 Ma. Netherlands Journal of Geosciences 93 (1): 729. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/njg.2014.12
Coles, B. 1998. Doggerland: a speculative survey. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 64: 4581.
Currant, A. & Jacobi, R.. 2001. A formal mammalian biostratigraphy for the Late Pleistocene of Britain. Quaternary Science Reviews 20: 1707–16. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-3791(01)00035-X
Dix, J. & Sturt, F.. 2011. The relic palaeo-landscapes of the Thames Estuary (MALSF 09/P126). Lowestoft: Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund.
Engelhard, G.H. 2008. One hundred and twenty years of change in fishing power of English North Sea trawlers, in Payne, A., Cotter, J. & Potter, T. (ed.) Advances in fisheries science: 50 years on: 125. Oxford: Blackwell.
Fitch, S., Thomson, K. & Gaffney, V.L.. 2005. Late Pleistocene and Holocene depositional systems and palaeogeography of the Dogger Bank, North Sea. Quaternary Research 64: 185–96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yqres.2005.03.007
Gaffney, V., Thomson, K. & Fitch, S.. 2007. Mapping Doggerland: the Mesolithic landscapes of the southern North Sea. Oxford: Archaeopress.
Gaffney, V., Fitch, S. & Smith, D.. 2009. Europe's lost world: the rediscovery of Doggerland (CBA Research Report 160). Oxford: Archaeopress.
Guthrie, R.D. 1982. Mammals of the mammoth steppe as paleoenvironmental indicators, in Hopkins, D.M., Matthews, C.E., Schweger, C.E. & Young, S.B. (ed.) Paleoecology of Beringia: 307–76. New York: Academic. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-355860-2.50030-2
Guthrie, R.D. 2001. Origin and causes of the mammoth steppe: a story of cloud cover, woolly mammal tooth pits, buckles, and inside-out Beringia. Quaternary Science Reviews 20: 549–74. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-3791(00)00099-8
Hijma, M., Cohen, K., Roebroeks, W., Westerhoff, W. & Busschers, F.. 2012. Pleistocene Rhine-Thames landscapes: geological background for hominin occupation of the southern North Sea region. Journal of Quaternary Science 27: 1739. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jqs.1549
Hublin, J-J., Weston, D., Gunz, P., Richards, M., Roebroeks, W., Glimmerveen, J. & Anthonis, L.. 2009. Out of the North Sea: the Zeeland Ridges Neanderthal. Journal of Human Evolution 57: 777–85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhevol.2009.09.001
Kahlke, R.-D. 1999. The history of the origin, evolution and dispersal of the Late Pleistocene Mammuthus-Coelodonta faunal complex in Eurasia (large mammals) (English translation). Hot Springs: Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, South Dakota.
Kahlke, R.-D. & Lacombat, F.. 2008. The earliest immigration of woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta tologoijensis, Rhinocerotidae, Mammalia) into Europe and its adaptive evolution in Palaearctic cold stage mammal faunas. Quaternary Science Reviews 27: 1951–61. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.07.013
Kortenbout van der Sluijs, G. 1971. Bones of mammals from the Brown Bank area (North Sea), in Kooijmans, L.P. Louwe, Mesolithic bone and antler implements from the North Sea and from the Netherlands, in van Es, W.A., van Regteren Altena, J.R. & Mank, W.C. (ed.) Berichten van de Rijksdienst voor Oudheidkundig Bodemonderzoek 20–21: 6970. The Hague: ROB.
Layton, J. 1827. Account of the fossil remains in the neighbourhood of Harborough. Edinburgh Journal of Science VI: 199201.
Lister, A., Parfitt, S., Owen, F., Collinge, S. & Breda, M.. 2010. Metric analysis of ungulate mammals in the early Middle Pleistocene of Britain, in relation to taxonomy and biostratigraphy II: Cervidae, Equidae and Suidae. Quaternary International 228: 157–79. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2010.05.014
Mol, D. & Post, K.. 2010. Gericht korren op de Noordzee voor de zoogdierpaleontologie: een historisch overzicht van de uitgevoerde expedities. Cranium 27 (2): 1428.
Mol, D., Post, K., Reumer, J.W.F., van der Plicht, H. & de Vos, J.. 2006. The Eurogeul—first report of the palaeontological, palynological and archaeological investigations of this part of the North Sea, the Netherlands. Quaternary International 142–43: 178–85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2005.03.015
Momber, G., Tomalin, D., Scaife, R., Satchell, J. & Gillespie, J.. 2011. Mesolithic occupation at Bouldnor Cliff and the submerged prehistoric landscapes of the Solent (CBA Research Report 164). York: English Heritage & Council for British Archaeology.
Peeters, H., Murphy, P. & Flemming, N.. 2009. North Sea prehistory research and management framework. Amersfoort: Rijksdienst voor Cultureel Erfgoed; Swindon: English Heritage.
Preece, R.C. & Parfitt, S.A.. 2012. The Early and early Middle Pleistocene context of human occupation and lowland glaciation in Britain and Northern Europe. Quaternary International 271: 628. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2012.04.018
Reid, C. 1890. The Pliocene deposits of Britain. London: HM Stationery Office.
Reid, C. 1913. Submerged forests. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Robinson, R. 1996. Trawling: the rise and fall of the British trawl fishery. Exeter: University of Exeter Press.
Roebroeks, W. 2014. Terra incognita: the Palaeolithic record of northwest Europe and the information potential of the southern North Sea. Netherlands Journal of Geosciences 93: 4353. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/njg.2014.1
Schreve, D. 2004. The Quaternary mammals of southern and eastern England, field guide. London: Quaternary Research Association.
Smith, W.H.F. & Sandwell, D.T.. 1997. Global sea floor topography from satellite altimetry and ship depth soundings. Science 277: 1956–62. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.277.5334.1956
Smylie, M. 1999. Traditional fishing boats of Britain and Ireland. Shrewsbury: Waterline.
Tizzard, L., Bicket, A.R., Benjamin, J. & Loecker, D.D.. 2014. A Middle Palaeolithic site in the southern North Sea: investigating the archaeology and palaeogeography of Area 240. Journal of Quaternary Science 29: 698710. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jqs.2743
Turner, E. 1997. Ariendorf—Quaternary deposits and Palaeolithic excavations in the Karl Schneider gravel pit. Jahrbuch des Romisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums Mainz 44: 3191.
van Kolfschoten, T. & Laban, C.. 1995. Pleistocene terrestrial mammal faunas from the North Sea. Mededelingen Rijks Geologische Dienst 52: 135–51.
Westley, K., Bailey, G., Davies, W., Firth, A., Flemming, N., Gaffney, V. & Gibbard, P.. 2013. The Palaeolithic, in Ransley, J., Sturt, F., Dix, J., Adams, J. & Blue, L. (ed.) People and the sea: a maritime archaeological research agenda for England (CBA Research Reports 171): 1029. York: Council for British Archaeology.
Wymer, J.J. 1968. Palaeolithic archaeology in Britain as represented by the Thames Valley. London: John Baker.

Keywords

Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary materials

Bynoe supplementary material
Bynoe supplementary material 1

 PDF (225 KB)
225 KB
EXCEL
Supplementary materials

Bynoe supplementary material
Bynoe supplementary material 2

 Excel (64 KB)
64 KB
EXCEL
Supplementary materials

Bynoe supplementary material
Bynoe supplementary material 3

 Excel (12 KB)
12 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed