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Some Prehistoric Ways

  • R. C. C. Clay
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In Palæolithic times when each family was self-contained, before social laws and customs had bound such units together to form tribes and clans, the hunters, for such they all were, followed their quarry through the forests and along the valleys, keeping to no set trackways. They needed none, for trackways imply thoroughfares to and from fixed sites or habitations—and the Palaeolithic hunter was a nomad.

When the amalgamation of families took place in early Neolithic or Epipalaeolithic times, no doubt the marsh-dwellers had recognized paths across the swamps to the mainland, and those who formed the shell-mounds of Ertebolle may have used beaten paths along the shore from estuary to estuary.

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page 54 note 1 Mr A. Keiller has recently found at Windmill Hill, near Avebury, several saddle querns and grain rubbers associated with round-bottomed bowls. This appears to be the earliest proof of corn growing in Britain, but Kossina credits the Ertebolle peoples of Denmark with the cultivation of local grains (see Childe, , Dawn of European Civilization, p. 16).

page 55 note 1 Wilts. Arch. & Nut. Hist. Mag., xlii, 457.

page 55 note 2 Ibid. xliii, 59.

page 55 note 3 The great sheep fairs at Yarnbury Castle, Weyhill and Tan Hill may owe their origin to their position on the junctions of such roads.

page 56 note 1 Antiq. Jour., ii, 27 and W. A. & N. H. M., xliii, 313.

page 56 note 2 Arch. Jour. (1920), 27, 27.

page 56 note 3 To be published shortly in Wessex from the Air.

page 56 note 4 Arch.Jour. (1919), 26, 193.

page 56 note 5 Very similar in design to Chiselbury.

page 57 note 1 Mr Newall’s excavations have proved this site to date from La Tène III.

page 57 note 2 Just after the war I examined a portion of the rampart on the north side that had been damaged by a bomb and in the material forming the rampart found a large piece of pottery that is unquestionably Early Iron Age in date.

page 57 note 3 Crawford, . Observer, 4 Oct. 1925.

page 57 note 4 Freeman, Williams. Field Archceology (map at end of book).

page 57 note 5 Curwen. Sussex Arch. Coll. lxiv ; also Williamson. Brighton & Hove Arch. ii, P. 55.

page 57 note 6 Geographical Jour., lxi, 342.

page 57 note 7 The Antiquary, Nov. 1911 ; also Procs. Dorset N. H. & A. Field Club, 1925.

page 59 note 1 Wilts 6-inch O.S. 59 SW.

page 60 note 1 Curwen, Sussex Arch. Coll., Ixiv.

page 60 note 2 Curwen, , Brighton & Hove Arch., i, 36 ; also Freeman, Williams, Field Arch., P. 47.

page 61 note 1 Ancient Wilts., South, p. 244.

page 61 note 2 Curwen, Sussex Arch. Coll., lix. See also Warne, , Ancient Dorset, p. 25 . Philips, , The Rivers, Mountains and Sea Coast of Yorks., p. 215 . Rivers, Pitt , Brit. Assoc.Report, 1881, p. 690 . Greenwell, British Barrows, p. iii. Guest, Origines Celticæ, ii, p. 200. Cole, , Yorks. Geol. & Polytechnic Soc. Proc., 1888, p. 45 . Mortimer, Forty Years’ Researches, p. 379. Clark, Kitson, Proc. Soc. Antiq. Lond. xxiii, p. 309 . Wilts A. and N.H.M., xxxviii, p. 69.

page 61 note 3 For example see Wilts 6-inch o.s. 69, NE, SE, and NW.

page 63 note 1 Sussex Arch. Coil., Ixvii, 138–45.

page 64 note 1 W. A. & N. H. M., xliii, 435.

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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
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