Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Urban form, infrastructure and spatial organisation in the Roman Empire

  • John W. Hanson (a1), Scott G. Ortman (a2), Luís M.A. Bettencourt (a3) and Liam C. Mazur (a3)

Abstract

Although there has been considerable scholarly interest in the nature of ancient cities, it has been difficult to identify and explore quantitative patterns in their design and amenities. Here, the authors offer a model for the relationship between the population size and infrastructural area of settlements, before testing it against measures of urban form in the Roman Empire. They advocate a more consistent approach to the investigation of settlements that is capable of not only incorporating sites with divergent physical forms and historical trajectories into the same model, but also able to expose their similarities and differences.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Urban form, infrastructure and spatial organisation in the Roman Empire
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Urban form, infrastructure and spatial organisation in the Roman Empire
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Urban form, infrastructure and spatial organisation in the Roman Empire
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence (Email: j.w.hanson@reading.ac.uk)

References

Hide All
Angel, S., Parent, J., Civco, D.L. & Blei, A.M. (ed.). 2012. An atlas of urban expansion. Cambridge (MA): Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
Batty, M. 2013. The new science of cities. Cambridge (MA): MIT Press. https://doi.org/10.7551/mitpress/9399.001.0001
Bettencourt, L.M.A. 2013. The origins of scaling in cities. Science 340: 1438–41. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1235823
Bettencourt, L.M.A. & West, G.B.. 2010. A unified theory of urban living. Nature 467: 912–13. https://doi.org/10.1038/467912a
Bettencourt, L.M.A., Lobo, J., Helbing, D., Kühnert, C. & West, G.B.. 2007. Growth, innovation, scaling, and the pace of life in cities. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 104: 7301–306. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0610172104
Burns, R. 2017. The origins of the colonnaded streets in the cities of the Roman East. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Carandini, A., Carafa, P. & Campbell Halavais, A.. 2017. The atlas of ancient Rome: biography and portraits of the city. Princeton (NJ): Princeton University Press.
Cesaretti, R., Lobo, J., Bettencourt, L.M.A., Ortman, S. & Smith, M.E.. 2016. Population-area relationship for Medieval European cities. PLoS ONE 11(10): e0162678. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162678
Di Vita, A. 1979. Il progetto originario del forum novum Severianum a Leptis Magna. 150-Jahr-Feier Deutsches archäelogisches Institut Rom, MDAI(R) 25: 84100.
Dobbins, J.J. & Foss, P.W. (ed.). 2005. The world of Pompeii. London: Routledge.
Fujita, M., Krugman, P.R. & Venables, A.J.. 2001. The spatial economy: cities, regions, and international trade. Cambridge (MA): MIT Press.
Gros, P. 1996. L'architecture romaine: du début du IIIe siècle av. J.-C. à la fin du Haut-Empire. Paris: Picard.
Hanson, J.W. 2016. An urban geography of the Roman world, 100 BC to AD 300. Oxford: Archaeopress.
Hanson, J.W. & Ortman, S.G.. 2017. A systematic method for estimating the populations of Greek and Roman settlements. Journal of Roman Archaeology 30: 301–24. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1047759400074134
Hanson, J.W., Ortman, S.G. & Lobo, J.. 2017. Urbanism and the division of labour in the Roman Empire. Journal of the Royal Society Interface 14(136): 112. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2017.0367
Kostof, S. 1991. The city shaped: urban patterns and meanings through history. New York: Thames & Hudson.
Kostof, S. 1992. The city assembled: elements of urban form through history. New York: Thames & Hudson.
Laurence, R., Esmonde Cleary, S. & Sears, G.. 2011. The city in the Roman West, c. 250 BC–c. AD 250. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511975882
Louf, R. & Barthelemy, M.. 2014. A typology of street patterns. Journal of the Royal Society Interface 11(101): 17. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2014.0924
MacDonald, W.L. 1986. The architecture of the Roman Empire. London: Yale University Press.
Mandich, M.J. 2016. Urban scaling and the growth of Rome, in Gonzalez Sanchez, S., Savani, G., Zampieri, E., Derrick, T.J. & Mandich, M.J. (ed.) TRAC 2015: proceedings of the 25th Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference: 188203. Oxford: Oxbow.
McKenzie, J. 2007. The architecture of Alexandria and Egypt. New Haven (CT): Yale University Press.
Ortman, S.G., Cabaniss, A.H.F., Sturm, J.O. & Bettencourt, L.M.A.. 2014. The pre-history of urban scaling. PLoS ONE 9: e8790. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0087902
Ossa, A., Smith, M.E. & Lobo, J.. 2017. The size of plazas in Mesoamerican cities and towns: a quantitative analysis. Latin American Antiquity 28: 457–75. https://doi.org/10.1017/laq.2017.49
Poehler, E. 2017. The traffic systems of Pompeii. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Rowland, I.D. & Howe, T.N.. 1999. Vitruvius: ten books on architecture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Smith, M.E. 2007. Form and meaning in the earliest cities: a new approach to ancient urban planning. Journal of Planning History 6: 347. https://doi.org/10.1177/1538513206293713
Strano, E., Nicosia, V., Latora, V., Porta, S. & Barthelemy, M.. 2012. Elementary processes governing the evolution of road networks. Scientific Reports 2(296): 18. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep00296
Ward-Perkins, J.B. 1981. Roman imperial architecture. London: Penguin.
Zuiderhoek, A. 2016. The ancient city. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary materials

Hanson et al. supplementary material
Hanson et al. supplementary material 1

 PDF (146 KB)
146 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed