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Vacuum freeze-drying of sediment cores: an optimised method for preserving archaeostratigraphic archives

  • Renée Enevold (a1), Paul Flintoft (a2), Anna K.E. Tjellden (a1) and Søren M. Kristiansen (a3)

Abstract

The authors introduce an ongoing project that explores a solution for the long-term preservation of proxies in archaeological and geological sediment cores to protect unique palaeoenvironmental data. To prevent alterations of organic properties and/or fungal growth, the sediment cores are vacuum freeze-dried, allowing long-term storage at 55 per cent relative humidity (RH).

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence (Email: re@moesgaardmuseum.dk)

References

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