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Are schizophrenics more religious? Do they have more daughters?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 June 2008

Satoshi Kanazawa
Affiliation:
Interdisciplinary Institute of Management, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE Department of Psychology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT Department of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London, London WC1E 7HX, United Kingdom. S.Kanazawa@lse.ac.ukhttp://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/MES/people/Kanazawa.htm

Abstract

Combined with recent evolutionary psychological theories, Crespi & Badcock's (C&B's) intragenomic conflict theory of the social brain suggests that schizophrenics are more religious, and autistics are less religious, than the normal population. Combined with the generalized Trivers-Willard hypothesis (gTWH), it suggests that schizophrenics have more daughters, and autistics have more sons, than expected.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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