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Basic tastes and basic emotions: Basic problems and perspectives for a nonbasic solution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2008

David Sander
Affiliation:
Swiss Center for Affective Sciences and Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland. David.Sander@pse.unige.chhttp://www.affective-sciences.org

Abstract

Contemporary behavioral and brain scientists consider the existence of so-called basic emotions in a similar way to the one described by Erickson for so-called basic tastes. Commenting on this analogy, I argue that similar basic problems are encountered in both perspectives, and I suggest a potential nonbasic solution that is tested in emotion research (i.e., the appraisal model of emotion).

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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