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Come down from the clouds: Grounding Bayesian insights in developmental and behavioral processes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 August 2011

Gavin W. Jenkins
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology and Delta Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1407. gavin-jenkins@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/gavin_jenkinslarissa-samuelson@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/larissa_samuelsonjohn-spencer@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/john_spencer
Larissa K. Samuelson
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology and Delta Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1407. gavin-jenkins@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/gavin_jenkinslarissa-samuelson@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/larissa_samuelsonjohn-spencer@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/john_spencer
John P. Spencer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology and Delta Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1407. gavin-jenkins@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/gavin_jenkinslarissa-samuelson@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/larissa_samuelsonjohn-spencer@uiowa.eduhttp://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/people/john_spencer

Abstract

According to Jones & Love (J&L), Bayesian theories are too often isolated from other theories and behavioral processes. Here, we highlight examples of two types of isolation from the field of word learning. Specifically, Bayesian theories ignore emergence, critical to development theory, and have not probed the behavioral details of several key phenomena, such as the “suspicious coincidence” effect.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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