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Contents of the approximate number system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 December 2021

Jack C. Lyons*
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Glasgow, GlasgowG12 8QQ, UK. Jack.Lyons@glasgow.ac.uk; https://sites.google.com/view/jack-lyons/home

Abstract

Clarke and Beck argue that the approximate number system (ANS) represents rational numbers, like 1/3 or 3.5. I think this claim is not supported by the evidence. Rather, I argue, ANS should be interpreted as representing natural numbers and ratios among them; and we should view the contents of these representations are genuinely approximate.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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