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Deep-learning networks and the functional architecture of executive control

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2017

Richard P. Cooper*
Affiliation:
Centre for Cognition, Computation and Modelling, Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, London WC1E 7HX, United Kingdom. R.Cooper@bbk.ac.ukhttp://www.bbk.ac.uk/psychology/our-staff/richard-cooper

Abstract

Lake et al. underrate both the promise and the limitations of contemporary deep learning techniques. The promise lies in combining those techniques with broad multisensory training as experienced by infants and children. The limitations lie in the need for such systems to possess functional subsystems that generate, monitor, and switch goals and strategies in the absence of human intervention.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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