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Differentiating defensive and predatory aggression: Neuropsychological systems and personality in sex differences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2009

Philip J. Corr
Affiliation:
School of Social Work and Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, United Kingdom. Philip.corr@btopenworld.com
Adam M. Perkins
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, School of Human Sciences, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom. 342095@swansea.ac.uk

Abstract

We draw a distinction between defensive and predatory forms of aggression, and how these forms relate to basic neuropsychological systems, especially the Fight-Flight-Freeze-System (FFFS; putatively related to defensive aggression), and the Behavioural Approach System (BAS; putatively related to predatory aggression). These systems may help further to account for proximal brain processes and personality influences in the context of sex differences.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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