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Martyrdom redefined: Self-destructive killers and vulnerable narcissism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2014

Leonardo Bobadilla*
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, Oregon State Hospital, Salem, OR, 97301. leonardo.bobadilla25@gmail.comhttp://leonardobobadilla.blogspot.com/

Abstract

Lankford shows that suicide terrorists have much in common with maladjusted persons who die by suicide. However, what differentiates suicidal killers from those who “only” commit suicide? A key element may be vulnerable narcissism. Narcissism has been simultaneously linked to interpersonal aggression, achievement, and depression. These traits may explain the paradoxical picture of a person who may appear “normal” in some aspects, and yet hate himself and others so intensely as to seek mutual destruction.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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