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The missing link: Dynamic, modifiable representations in working memory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2008

Graeme S. Halford
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, 4111, Australia
Steven Phillips
Affiliation:
Neuroscience Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, 305-8568. Japan
William H. Wilson
Affiliation:
School of Computer Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia. g.halford@griffith.edu.auhttp://www.griffith.edu.au/school/psy/ProfessorGraemeHalfordsteve@ni.aist.go.jphttp://staff.aist.go.jp/steven.phillipsbillw@cse.unsw.edu.auhttp://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~billw

Abstract

We propose that the missing link from nonhuman to human cognition lies with our ability to form, modify, and re-form dynamic bindings between internal representations of world-states. This capacity goes beyond dynamic feature binding in perception and involves a new conception of working memory. We propose two tests for structured knowledge that might alleviate the impasse in empirical research in nonhuman animal cognition.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright ©Cambridge University Press 2008

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References

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